Micro – Urban Infrastructure, Blending Predictions With Planning in 2017

Micro – Urban Infrastructure

micro urban infrastructure

Blending Predictions With Planning in 2017

Mike Patrick Dahlke

 

Mapping Power Customers From Highly Blueprinted Micro Grids.

Aligning Manufacturing Companies With Advanced Building Trade Sectors.

The Public Utility Market Meets The Private Mortgage Industry.

 

Mapping Power Customers From Highly Blueprinted Micro Grids.

What will determine the make up of a broad range of energy fields in 2017?

Will the structural blueprinting that has taken place in numerous energy sectors over the course of the last several years finally enable the masses to benefit from the technologies developed for the masses?

Does the year 2017 have a particular relevance to the inoculation of these technologies into our entire industrial economy?

For some very odd reason, the year of 2017 does seem to have a certain sense of urgency attached to it. If for no other reason than it signifies the first year in many that hopelessly over educated Democrats are no longer in control of any aspect of our federal government and we have a president who seems to have been educated solely on the concept of business belligerency, 2017 appears to be the year from which all concepts of energy management, all concepts of environmental stewardship and all theories of economic development as that development pertains to rebuilding all aspects of our nation’s power, transportation and financial infrastructure must come to some rather obvious and fluid form of manifestation.

In other words, 2017 does seem to be the year that all talk finally stops and progress by leaps and bounds finally smothers the mouths of a small army of babbling idiots who have attempted to rule our economy much more by a hopelessly detached sense of fantasy rather than a purposefully functioning model of full energy interactivity. Yes, 2017 is the year to which we all now turn to to cognitively embrace the fully attainable notion of building a nation of fully integrated micro-grids. As it is and anyone who has been working in the fields mentioned above is chomping at the bit to finally take the ball and run with it, key elements of key industries remain somewhat disconnected from one another. Because of this, even though 2017 will clearly be a year of enormous progress in several energy sectors, the underlying blueprint from which all energy sectors can effectively and fluidly commingle remains somewhat sketchy.

For those of you who have followed my writing on the subject of total urban planning over the course of the last eight years, you will note that my continued emphasis on the clear and cohesive development of regional based model building codes from which every other form of economic structural retooling must occur, remains the benchmark of my theory. In essence, and, quite simply, neither an individual homeowner, a municipality, a public utility, a public or private transportation entity or even a kid on a simple bicycle can benefit financially from the development of a truly advanced energy infrastructure model if the houses we live in are not governed by a set of building codes that ultimately determine the economic livelihood of the occupants living in that house.

Having said the above, this essay revues the writings of several people in key energy sectors who have made predictions for and are bringing forward plans to continue to grow the technologies that represent their particular energy field in 2017. With the purpose of doing so being to point out what I consider to be certain flaws in either the theory or the blueprint for the execution of the theory associated with a particular technology, this essay is not meant to attack the methodology of a given energy expert as much as it is to bring forth a that much more substantial discussion as to how a given technology could be integrated into the whole of our emerging national micro-grid model even further if the technology of one energy sector were fully wedded to the technology of another energy sector, or, even more so, how the technology of one energy sector could enable an entirely separate green industry to unfold by connecting seemingly unconnected dots from several sectors together to form new urban industrial economic links in the process.

I am going to start this essay looking at the development of solar roofing shingles and the larger concept of building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) . In my view, the solar roofing energy product sector has in particular the potential to become a rather significant economic link to a wide array of seemingly unrelated industrial functions as those functions do, in and of themselves address key elements of energy use management that would more than likely not be considered as related to the solar industry, but, in fact are. As it is important to note here that solar in general has somewhat of an awkward fit into today’s traditional energy grid and that awkwardness points primarily to the fact that solar only produces power during the day when in many cases demand is less, storing that power for evening use (in particular for residential applications) is today in 2017 considered to being the key to the successful integration of solar on a widespread community by community micro-grid level. As such, addressing the peripheral economic relationships the solar roofing shingle should have with the entirety of the roofing industry is the key.

With the advent of the advanced technology solar roofing shingle, one thing in particular has the potential to occur to the whole of the roofing industry. That one thing is the high level of customization required of each individual roof within a community micro-architectural cluster of homes that occupy the geographical footprint of a predetermined community solar grid. A case in point here is the customization of one particular roof that can be retrofitted to within a specific square foot percentage to actually house solar roofing shingles on it. As the solar shingle capacity of that one roof has been predetermined by the accurately engineered solar energy need and production capacity of every home within a predetermined cluster of homes, the determination of both solar generation and storage along with monitored consumption and disbursement has also been determined. Thus any given house on any given block within any given micro solar grid framework already has a list of solar assets attached to it’s energy grid participation index EGPI (if you will). Grasping the concept of a given homes EGPI then is crucial to understanding the relationship the solar roofing shingle has with the roofing industry as well as any other solar technology that may or may not be placed upon a roof or attached to the whole architectural footprint of a home within a whole community solar micro-grid of equally assessed homes.

If it is known that only 400 square feet of a 4,000 square foot roof surface can be dedicated to solar generation, it is then, also known that the remainder of that roof surface has to be covered by materials designed to capture passive solar daily heat gain via engineered heat storage and then disperse that heat gain evenly throughout the evening when solar electric storage is also being dispersed. As the combination of roofing materials is then the perfect medium from which solar energy is optimized, it is as well the perfect medium for economic growth in several industrial sectors that without such a comprehensive dialogue would not have the potential for long term economic growth if in fact they were viewed as either separate or competing industrial entities. Thus, as a result of this holistic solar engineering, a significant percentage of traditional American roofs currently covered in non organic and energy efficient petroleum based roofing shingles that have little to nothing whatsoever to do with anything even remotely associated with solar energy or the economy forming around placement of solar, the symbiotic relationship between the combination of passive solar heat gain and storage and active solar electrical energy gain and storage begins to merge quite smoothly with what obviously is the same industrial evolution taking place in the non fuel based production of advanced energy roofing systems.

While all of this is quite fascinating in theory, the fact of the matter is that neither the roofing industry nor the solar industry will find any significant form of long term sustainability in terms of overall economic growth until what it is I have described above is indeed put into practice. As both of these industries are essentially universally connected to one another, that connectivity goes even farther once the true structural blueprint of residential solar application and residential roofing application in conjoined to the delivery mechanisms associated with installing either solar shingles or traditional shingles onto a given roof not to mention a cluster of given roofs within the geographical blueprint of a community solar garden model.

A case in point for the above mentioned interactivity between the roofing and solar industry has to do with the industrial transportation needs required to deliver new product, remove and recycle old product and/or to service and maintain advanced energy rooftop systems within a community solar micro-grid. Just as interesting to grasp as it is as well entirely foolish to ignore, attaching the industrial transportation need of the roofing industry to the whole residential retrofit sustainability mix brings into play both EV charging and storage technology as well as LNG and CNG fueling station modeling of the roofing industry transportation fleet not to mention the personal transportation needs of the micro-grid based residential homeowner.

Whereas what I am describing is clearly a fairly complicated integration of a broad host of industries into the community solar garden model, all of the technology required to do so clearly exists just as the advanced metering infrastructure AMI technology to monitor all of these industrial interactions exist as well meaning that all that is lacking is the structural framework to make all of this happen.

Skipping past the solar roofing shingle discussion for a minute and focusing on AMI and the potential this technology has to fully transform the structural framework of our nation’s public utility model, there are a number of technologies that along with the solar roofing shingle are in 2017 poised to reach a level of structural maturity that will bring the entire understanding of our public utility model into a much sharper and clearer focus enabling in the process a certain sense of economic confidence to take over. To the point where the discussion over who is president, what political party runs either the house or the senate, or what if anything even remotely related to legislative common sense comes out of Washington DC any time in the next eight years is absolutely meaningless, the technologies I speak about below are in fact the technologies that will virtually run our economy in spite of any attempt by any political party to alter their collective ability to do so. Yet even as these technologies are poised to reshape our entire national public electric and public transportation grid, none of them will do anything well if in fact they are not utilized to integrate the seemingly meaningless concept of industrial cross training or industrial cross breading from within the framework I mentioned above and that must coexist between industrial sectors that are currently viewed as being either entirely unrelated to one another, or, as I’ve said before, competitively at odds with one another for virtually no good or rational economic reason whatsoever.

James McPhail, CEO of Zen Ecosystems; Adrian Tuck, CEO of Tendril and Will Greene, product management, energy and safety services at Nest are each operating companies that are now and will more than likely continue to clearly provide the high tech management of energy information required of truly advanced energy engineered residential architecture well into the future. As each of these men and their companies have products designed to process and share energy information with a broad host of entities that could conceivably benefit from this information, each of the technologies these three companies represent more or less address the same need to process energy information. Having said this, the likelihood of one or more of these companies to fail financially within just the next few years is rather substantial due exclusively to the fact that the information being acquired and being shared by others who can manage this information for financial gain diminishes rapidly if that information is not used to grow new industries or connect existing industries to technologies that expand substantially a given industrial sector’s market reach.

The ZEN Thermostat offers it’s consumer base a broad range of information management and gathering amenities all of which are essentially designed to save the thermostat user money on energy use over the course of time. In turn, TENDRIL’S My Home offers the user the first mobile application to unify utility programs into a single, personalized interface”. The problem with both of the products being offered by these two companies is that, for all practical purposes, their products are nothing more than basic thermostats connected to basic cell phones to connect information with basic information providers who are for the most part not even remotely connected to any of the energy industries that are also supposed to be being built into the architectural footprint of any given advanced energy engineered home found on a modern, neighborhood based micro-grid. As I am not trying to pick on these two companies any more than I am trying to pick apart the technologies of NEST and it’s Nest Thermostat, the point is clear, a thermostat only tells the temperature of a space. And, until all of the technologies needed of that space to both produce and manage the energy related to that space are intact the potential of market failure of these three information systems remains substantial.

On another hand however, John Carrington, CEO of Stem offers up one of the very product systems that justifies the growth or expansion of the smart thermostat into entirely new markets.

Stem works with leading utilities and grid service providers to harness our aggregated storage network as a cost-competitive, controllable and fast-acting capacity resources in a way that generates new value streams to utilities”.

Customer-sited storage is a powerful resource that delivers reliable services to the grid while helping customers shape their loads for the benefit of the grid”.

The above quotes are taken directly from STEM’s website and are focused exclusively on what Stem actually does which is to produce the energy storage platforms that should be in place in every piece of residential architecture in America to one extent or another nationwide and on a very much regionally specific model building code that allows all participants of any energy segment associated with the retrofitting of existing architecture the ability to do so from within a clearly written advanced regulatory building code enforcement framework.

Another quote from STEM’s website: “Visibility and control to the grid edge”; Using Stem’s PowerMonitors, operators gain precise visibility behind the customer’s meter or on distribution lines. Stem’s PowerScope software enables visibility and control into Stem’s fleet of energy storage devices” – sums up the potential of advanced thermostat technology working in unison with equally advanced storage technology to produce the residential market for advanced building-automation via advanced building trade skills development.

With the issue being one one hand a combination of managing energy produced by building owner groups and submetering companies, the larger issue is the sheer proliferation of all energy sectors once all building trades are fully informed of all energy technologies capable of being integrated into a given micro-grid.

 

State Energy Policies in 2017

Aligning Manufacturing Companies With Advanced Building Trade Sectors.

With policy for renewables and distributed generation set at the state level, it goes without saying that every state is currently undergoing a substantial review of anything to do with energy policy. As such, leaders in all energy fields are awaiting multiple levels of guidance from state regulators in order to once and for all move these sectors into the common core of energy policy and the common dialogue of what should be every day and ordinary discussion of best business practices as that discussion pertains to infrastructure expansion.

As the traditional drivers of infrastructure additions were load growth and connecting distant generation sources to population centers, today load growth is relatively minimal whereas conversations over connecting distant generation sources to local energy need are clearly being supplanted with comprehensive micro-grid dialogue. With the above being the case and renewables clearly being looked upon as critical to meeting residential electric power demand, the notion of transporting electric power long distances is being replaced by the notion of transporting people short distances instead. With residential power load being managed to the point of efficiency never before seen in the industry and consumer habits about both conserving and micro managing power dominant across our nation, moving people about as opposed to moving power to people is just as an important issue as the power needed to do so.

EV technology, LNG and CNG technologies are all therefore critical areas of discussion in that we now have technology that entirely alters our presumptions of how to fuel vehicular traffic. As such, we also have an entirely new perspective on travel. As that perspective is increasingly about how to get from place to place within our own communities, it is as well about what it is we need in our communities to live the less long range mobile lifestyle many in our nation are coming to demand of their communities. Why go far when near can and should be much better?

With this ideology in mind, understanding the structural relationship between the energy sectors that are poised to power our nation’s urban transit model with the energy sector poised to power our nation’s residential energy model is paramount as one simply will not and more to the point cannot exist without the other.

To the point where concerns over the loss of baseload power that roiled organized markets around the country in 2016 will become more acute in 2017 this issue will be fully resolved once a comprehensive understanding between residential energy application and transportation based energy application has been had. As such, the dynamic that needs to be understood is precisely how power generation for these two separate sectors is designed as both a rate creator for the fulfillment of transportation based infrastructure improvements as well as a rate creator for the same infrastructure improvements of the electric grid as well as other grid systems such as municipal rainwater and storm water management. Once the rate structure is in place concerns over the shuttering of old fossil fuel plants or the bankruptcy of poorly managed utility providers will be replaced by the much more fluid structures outlined above. Either way the natural evolution of all energy technologies once caught up with the natural evolution of all financing technologies will make the definition of power distribution from either a long distant region to region distribution standpoint or a localized micro-grid generation and/or storage/distribution standpoint quite valid.

With the key to this type of long range transmission planning being a firm understanding of DERs and the interconnectivity of distributed energy resources to and with the building trades within multiple municipalities within a given state, at the present time due exclusively to the fact that an electrician doing business in one community that does perhaps house a decidedly more educated population than another community in the same state, that educated electrician is at a distinct economic disadvantage. Due to the fact that once he attempts to expand his electrical business to another community only to find the consumer base and labor base is virtually clueless to the technology he is an expert at installing, he, because of his advanced knowledge of DERs remains financially constricted to the smart community while the stupidity of the neighboring community brings down the entire state’s economic performance in otherwise viable DER markets. While all of this might sound a bit ludicrous, the fact of the matter is that without statewide model building codes, without comprehensive statewide alternative transportation regulatory knowledge and without comprehensive statewide policy on neighborhood micro-grid development, the state and virtually every industry in the state is at a fundamental risk of economic collapse due to the fact that the state is operating without a tangible infrastructure model in the first place.

 

Back to the Solar Roofing Shingle

The Public Utility Market Meets The Private Mortgage Industry.

Regardless of opinion, solar energy is at the core of all future industrial growth in our America. Due simply to the fact that virtually every building built has solar gain potential attached to it somewhere within it’s architectural footprint and that solar gain transformed to either heat or energy storage fully alters, or, much more to the point, fully celebrates the fact that our entire American industrial society has simply evolved.

Solar engineering knowledge is as common place as the knowledge surrounding waking up in the morning. More specifically, solar energy can be demonstrated to anyone by simply sitting on a picnic table outside on a cold but sunny winter day without gloves on. Regardless of where you place your hands on that table, one hand will eventually become either warmer or colder than the other due simply to the arc of the sun as it transverses the surface of the table while you sit there as well as the fact that one hand will block the rays of the sun from getting to the other if both hands are left immobile. Once however the hands begin to work in unison with one another, one hand might reach for an item to help block the prevailing wind blowing across the surface of the table while the other will reach for something to insulate both hands from the rising dampness coming from the ground beneath the picnic table. The moment both hands reach for an advanced packet of DERs however, the earth, the picnic table and the body attached to the hands sitting at the picnic table are not only warm but fully capable of holding the dollar bills generated by the mind attached to the body to invest in the infrastructure that makes it all possible in the first place.

Solar energy is simply here to stay. As such, determining whether or not this energy sector has the possibility to generate as much electrical current as fossil fuels is neither here nor there. What is important therefore is to redefine what we consider as baseload, or, more to the point what we consider as being highly task specific groupings of multiple baseloads that are strategically placed geographically around the picnic table to enhance the energy, environmental and economic performance of the people sitting at the table.

The key to advanced energy growth in 2017 remains as it has been, state and much more specifically, local decision making that is designed to substantially expose via comprehensive community based education, the remarkably broad application of DERs into the advanced socioeconomic framework of each and every neighborhood in each and every community statewide and in all fifty states nationwide This can happen rapidly if something equally dynamic begins to take place within the context of fully developing a neighborhood based micro-grid economy. With the something I am speaking about being a combination of a whole and total before and after energy audit of a residential property via the traditional mortgage application, such before and after knowledge would serve the community banking community in every bit the comprehensive manner as it would serve the service sector and manufacturing entities that do business within that community not to mention all public utility providers whose collective potential for realizing a substantial rate of return on a collective body of distributed energy resources is virtually nil without that before and after energy audit.

If all a given homeowner has to do is walk into a local real estate office to view a list of properties that suite his or her’s physical architectural needs, view a complete photo gallery of that properties physical assets while in turn viewing a complete before and after energy performance profile of that dwelling only to simply walk down the street to the local lender to qualify a mortgage based upon that homeowner’s intention to architectural improve that dwelling over time?

This is not in any manner a wayward and abstract thought. In fact, what I have just described is a classically and historically accurate scenario to the path to home ownership, ongoing home improvement planning, continued community development, continuous updating of fair market residential real estate value of constantly improved real residential property neighborhood wide. reliable assessments of public utility billings, exposure to a well educated and well funded community school district and access to a broad host of retail, service and manufacturing based business entities that thrive in that neighborhood due simply to exposure to advanced DER based environmental consciousness not to mention a AAA bond rating for that whole micro-grid based neighborhood of real and fully functioning neighbors.

Thanks for stopping by.

self awareness

Mike Patrick Dahlke

 

Curriculum vitae

 

Please take the time to visit some of my other essays.

 

Transforming Redundant Affirmative Action To Green Affirmative Action In America

 

Interior Urban Networks And Sustainable Chicago 2015

 

Restructuring Public Utility Industrial Demand Response

 

How To Build An Organic Grain Bin

 

Urban Planning: The Fine Art Of Attaching Organic Belly Buttons

 

American Housing, The Bird On A Wire In 2015

 

The Real Flint, Michigan Water Pipeline

 

Into Chicago, Making Neighborhoods Economically Green.

 

Advancing America’s Green Electric Metering Infrastructure

 

When Green Dollars Go Nowhere, They’re Probably Not Green “The True Nature of Secular Stagnation.”

 

The National Movement toward Green Urban Renewal Takes a Turn to the Country to Pick Up a Few Things.

 

Establishing True Green Market Valuation of America’s Non Green Housing Stock

 

How To Heat An American Sidewalk

 

The Birth of 21st Century Housing, Transportation and Public Utility Infrastructure Corporations

 

Establishing A Sustainable 21st Century, Regionally Based Nationwide Housing Finance System.

 

Painting A Typical American Town Green

 

Building Green Community Banks With Green Building Codes

 

How National Building Codes Will Bridge America’s Intelligence Gap.

 

Financing Our Mixed Energy Use, 21st Century Public Education Imperative

 

Public and Private Sector Education and Training Models For Our 21st Century, Mixed Energy Use Industrial Economy

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Why Neighborhood Microgrids?

Why Neighborhood Microgrids? Mike Patrick Dahlke The immediate needs for the development of neighborhood based public utility microgrids are as diverse as the people who live and work in the neighborhood who clearly will not survive financially in our 21st century without the microgrid being fully integrated into the whole economic life cycle of that […]

Why Neighborhood Microgrids?

infrastructure

Mike Patrick Dahlke

The immediate needs for the development of neighborhood based public utility microgrids are as diverse as the people who live and work in the neighborhood who clearly will not survive financially in our 21st century without the microgrid being fully integrated into the whole economic life cycle of that neighborhood.

As historically, virtually every neighborhood in every city and every region has always actually been a microgrid, the term, albeit being new in our 21st century dialogue, is nothing more than a definition of the whole and complete industrial process that has enabled communities to continuously grow and prosper since the day America was founded.

A microgrid is nothing more than a comprehensive industrial process involving a massive amount of mechanical functions that should always be seen as nothing more than normal daily functions naturally and casually performed by all who live and work in the neighborhood everyday without much thought going into doing so at all. As long as it is continued to be seen as such, the “microgrid” will flourish. Unfortunately today, the microgrid is just as fragmented as the social fabric that makes up the neighborhood. As such, re calibration of the mechanical aspects of the microgrid will in turn serve to re calibrate the social fabric that will in and of itself, re calibrate the financial model that assures overall normal daily functions of our nation of neighborhood microgrid clusters gets back on track.

To put what I just got through stating into perspective, consider the following:

Jaguar Land Rover takes a stake in ride-share operator Lyft.

Jaguar Land Rover, owned by India’s Tata Motors, is the latest automaker to take a stake in Lyft, as the ride-share operator continues to expand Irma partnerships with automakers and tech firms.

With this deal Jaguar Land Rover’s mobility services business, InMotion, invests $25 million in Lyft. The move will allow InMotion to develop and test mobility services including autonomous-drive vehicles with Lyft……….”

You can read the rest of the article here.

Summing the above article up, what Jaguar Land Rover is doing here is to attempt to position itself into what it considers to be as an emerging market of autonomously driven vehicles that will soon be taking over our American roadways. If you are like me, the notion of autonomous cars on are nation’s roadways is somewhat of a personally far fetched notion. Yet, if you are also somewhat like me, you are keeping an open mind to the possibility, but, if you either are or are not, the link below might serve to inform you of some of the benefits self driving cars might bring to our already overwhelmingly dysfunctional society.

10 Benefits of Self-Driving Cars

As the question about autonomous cars seems to be whether driver less vehicles can be more efficient that cars with drivers, the real question, which is entirely overlooked, is not about the car, but, rather the actual function of and need for the road in the first place. As the road itself is a fluid part of a neighborhood’s whole microgrid, how the microgrid is structured to help pay for the road is then, far more important than what is actually being driven over the road. As what is being driven today are vehicles with clearly new and multiple yet also highly matured sources of energy being utilized to power such vehicles, funding the roadway improvements that enable those fuel sources full delivery into the microgrid must be the mandate.

At any rate, in yet another article, this one coming from the folks at Midwest Energy News, the State of Minnesota is beginning to tackle the issue of rate structures for E Vs that are now and will in the future utilize these roadways more and more and in doing so bypassing taxation for roadway improvements because they simply do not use gasoline.

Minnesota electric vehicle advocates question fairness of new annual fee.

With the discussion in the above essay being about the fairness of the state’s new annual EV fee, and more precisely the manner in which the fee is pro rated, in this author’s view, attempting to place what can only be considered as a generic fee on a very much non generic, and, in fact. highly structured new transportation resource is akin to saying that while we kave say two million gasoline cars on the street and twenty electric cars and the kids with the gasoline cars are expected to pay for the roads they drive upon so the electric car kids should as well, again the issue comes down to the use of the road and the use of the road only.

Once that use is truly defined and is truly integrated into an equally defined blueprint of the whole neighborhood microgrid, the means for taxing the EV grows exponentially as does the definition of uses the EV can now provide the microgrid where gasoline powered vehicles never have in the past been able to and in fact, never in the future will be able to as well.

Having said the above, the EV cannot and clearly should not be considered as some sort of an oddball niche market segment when in fact the technology of the EV is so entirely intertwined with several other technologies that make up the whole of the neighborhood microgrid. Whereas some of the obvious relationships with the EV and other technologies are battery/energy storage and smart metering inter connectivity, as the storage capacity of the EV is a given, driving range is ultimately the issue here and within driving range again comes the structured use of the EV for a wide range of service industries that clearly should be regulated to utilize EV technology or other forms of alternative fuel transportation based technology so that the end use of all fuel technologies is to facilitate continuous long term maintenance and improvement of the neighborhood roadway surface within the neighborhood while in the same breath facilitating the same degree of maintenance and improvement beyond the neighborhood microgrid and into larger regional microgrids. As the issue again here is “vehicular range”, one of the current weaknesses found in the discussion of vehicular range is the obsession with comparing the distance a gasoline powered vehicle can travel to that of the distance an EV can.

With the real issue of all vehicular travel being the function of the whole fuel source powering the vehicle, within the context of what we know we can create for our 21st century neighborhood microgrid blueprint will have to be our ability to discipline ourselves to utilize a specific vehicle for a specific purpose and do so to fully enhance the whole economic performance of an emerging power technology within a community. Suffice to say, it is probably better to utilize an EV for a weekly trip to the grocery store or in fact enable EV technology utilized by the grocery store to deliver product to a home. Either way, due to smart metering technology, the notion of charging an annual use tax or rate for one EV to travel anywhere it wishes, fails entirely in the realization that highly specialized definitions of all forms of transportation use are abundant in virtually every neighborhood and as such can, should and ultimately must be regulated if we are still to have fully functioning microgrids in our nation.

As all one has to do is to look at the rapidly evolving technologies of community solar, power storage, specific demand response, smart metering and the like as energy assets designed to reduce consumption of traditional energy sources required to power our electric grid nationwide, bringing these technologies directly into the neighborhood microgrid immediately defines an entire new set of parameters for the use of every other energy source within that grid, Thus wind energy and geothermal, natural gas, LNG and LPG are funneling just as rapidly into that neighborhood microgrid blueprint as EV technology, energy efficient building products and systems, rainwater management technologies, fresh water purification technologies, hydroponic technologies and on and on – all of which means that within the state of regulatory parameters that currently exist in most states, integration of these assets are lagging or languishing due to a host of non performance based means testing of these multiple entities.

Being an advocate of universal regionally based model building codes, it is astounding to me how a given public utility in a given region and/or a given PUC representing an entire state can be virtually clueless as to how essential model building codes are to model microgrid development. In the very same breath, it is equally astounding to realize that those in charge of a state’s transportation infrastructure are equally clueless. If, however, such comingling of regulatory authority was in place, the very notion of “Vehicle Range” would almost immediately be abandoned by any rate making authority and be replaced instead by neighborhood based smart metering of whole family use of all energy sources coming from the micrgrid that family and all its many residential service providers regularly execute on their home to keep it and the vehicles going to and from that optimized for overall energy and economic performance.

To put the above paragraph into another perspective, picture three grown men driving to work in their urban SUVs every morning at the same hour and on the same highway. Each of these three men have very distnctive job titles in firmly established industrial sectors. One is an architect who designs advanced technologies office towers in Chicago. The other one is an administrator for the Illinois Commerce Commision that governs public utilities. Finally, the third one is an administrator for the Illinois Department of Transportation. Each of these three men have high profile jobs in fields that rarely if ever compel them to have any type of formal discussion with the other yet all of the technologies these three men are responsible for in their work lives and rely upon in their personal lives are virtually indespensible to one another on all levels economically and all levels pertaining to their common use of the very same neighborhood microgrid.

If you take the time to fully digest the thought above and then consider the fact that there are people in America who are seriously considering putting driverless cars on roadways alreaady cluttered with fully disconnected drivers who are actually supposed to be managing the whole of our nation’s neighborhood microgrids, the practical notion of placing a senseable and practical regulatory demand on grocery store owners to utilize EVs (or other alternative vehicle types) to deliver groceries and utilizing a transportation tax on those groceries to fund neighborhood based road repairs and upgrades might just cause the three men mentioned above to stay home and work in their field of expertise from within the confines of their solar powered home office.

Whereas all of this might sound absurd, the fact of the matter is that it is in fact very much so particularly when you consider the fact that the three men mentioned above might otherwise be considering the purchase of an EV if in fact the work they do for their various institutions was actually understood by their very own next door neighbors.

In another article published by Midwest Energy News, the issues I adressed above come home to roost on our collective ambitions of finally getting on with the task of re-engineering our neighborhood based microgrid framework.

Advocates say state regulators moving too slowly on grid modernization.

Within the context of the above article, advocates for grid modernization are asserting that for the most part, those that are in charge of upgrading our nation’s electrical network view the process of upgrading much more from the viewpoint of analytical researches and pragmatists as opposed to being movers and shakers. Playing it safe for the sake of nothing even remotely measurable, entire industrial sectors some having virtually nothing to do directly with energy production but having an endless list of energy management as well as cost management issues pertaining to grid modernization that are simply not being met due to the fact that the microgrid sector they get their power from has simply not updated itself? The problem with this rationale is that from a historical perspective, the overall lack of either an ability or a willingness to modernize the grid is precisely the reason we not only created the Great Depression of the late 1920s but did as well create the Great Recession of 2008.

As for all practical purposes, a significant part of the population in the US is still experiencing the negative sociological economic vacuum affect of 2008, particularly in the nation’s residential building and retrofitting industrial sectors, one would think that these regulatory entities would finally begin to attach the dots (which are many) that must immediately go into upgrading our vast array of neighborhood based microgrids.

Unfortunately, in order to accommodate this national momentum, education, particularly education focussed on high level industrial cross training between seemingly unrelated industrial entities is the key. In the same breath and in yet another essay; Beyond venture capital: Midwest clean tech looks for other funders amid gloomy investment outlook, the failure on the part of PUC regulators to get the ball rolling in the microgrid sector is causing significant hurdles to form for companies who are clearly ready and able to grow the microgrids we in America actually need now.

As the argument for overall slowness of attainable results when it comes to overall grid modernization has been regulatory constraints, such arguments again, fly right out the window when enough industrial sectors are actually brought into the dialogue of total grid modernization. A simple case in point here is my earlier discussion of grocery stores and the potential this particular industrial segment has to enhance not only the growth of the EV marketplace but the overall rate structures that assures not only the electric grid upgrade is cost effective, but the roads and bridges EVs utilize to travel upon are equally well funded due exclusively to the fact that the old regulatory model was simply and entirely discarded for being as useless as 19th century tits on a 21st century bull. When considering the whole effect America’s retail grocery industry can and should have on the emergence of the EV sector or any other alternative fuel based fleet delivery sector, it one thing to consider the home delivery of a finished food product to the neighborhood consumer. When doing so the number of food consuming neigborhood dwellers is stagering just from a food delivery standpoint, yet from a raw material delivery or bulk to the store delivery standpoint, that being food shipped to the grocery store, another even more robust public utility rate structure emerges which in turn enables yet another highway use tax to flourish as well.

Going right back to the dischssion of “Vehicular Range” simply stated, vehicular range is different for every weight class and every fuel class of every vehicle manufactured within the US. As such, given the true and whole nature of smart metering technology, the framework of regulated mileage and the implications of such advanced regulatory dialogue to fully redefine both weight and fuel classes not to mention multi-dimensional vehicle use classes is simply enormous.

Thanks for stopping by.

self awareness

 

Mike Patrick Dahlke

Curriculum vitae

 

Sailing Lessons

Please take the time to visit some of my other essays.

Transforming Redundant Affirmative Action To Green Affirmative Action In America

Interior Urban Networks And Sustainable Chicago 2015

Restructuring Public Utility Industrial Demand Response

How To Build An Organic Grain Bin

Urban Planning: The Fine Art Of Attaching Organic Belly Buttons

American Housing, The Bird On A Wire In 2015

The Real Flint, Michigan Water Pipeline

Into Chicago, Making Neighborhoods Economically Green.

Advancing America’s Green Electric Metering Infrastructure

When Green Dollars Go Nowhere, They’re Probably Not Green “The True Nature of Secular Stagnation.”

The National Movement toward Green Urban Renewal Takes a Turn to the Country to Pick Up a Few Things.

Establishing True Green Market Valuation of America’s Non Green Housing Stock

How To Heat An American Sidewalk

The Birth of 21st Century Housing, Transportation and Public Utility Infrastructure Corporations

Establishing A Sustainable 21st Century, Regionally Based Nationwide Housing Finance System.

Painting A Typical American Town Green

Building Green Community Banks With Green Building Codes

How National Building Codes Will Bridge America’s Intelligence Gap.

Financing Our Mixed Energy Use, 21st Century Public Education Imperative

Public and Private Sector Education and Training Models For Our 21st Century, Mixed Energy Use Industrial Economy

 

Solyndra, Brilliant Technology Lost in the Abyss of Poorly Structured Federal Energy Legislation

    Mike Patrick Dahlke Please Note: “I wrote this essay back in 2011. As such, a significant amount of regulatory blueprinting pertaining to the development of all aspects of our nation’s green public utility sector have matured to the point where alternative energy industrial sectors are clearly poised to enter into our nation’s public […]

 

 

Mike Patrick Dahlke

Please Note:

“I wrote this essay back in 2011. As such, a significant amount of regulatory blueprinting pertaining to the development of all aspects of our nation’s green public utility sector have matured to the point where alternative energy industrial sectors are clearly poised to enter into our nation’s public utility sector mainframe. None the less, I am republishing this essay in it’s original form due to the fact that while I am fully aware of the formulation of dynamic public utility sector business models being developed now in all fifty states, the reality is that there are literally thousands of communities in each of these fifty states that need to be able to take the regulatory ball that is being modeled by both legislators and public utility administrators, until the knowledge these men and women are formulating in state capitals is indeed brought fully to every small town and big city mayor, those that are supposed to benefit financially from such legislation still have a long time to wait before the needed economic development attached to public utility restructuring is realized.

When reading this essay, please keep in mind the many other essays on the subject of not only public utility restructuring but broad based community economic development I have written. Each and everyone of them is integral to the other.”

 

Solyndra, Brilliant Technology

Lost in the Abyss of

Poorly Structured Federal Energy Legislation

The fundamental truth behind a truly expansive industrial free market economy is the realization that all industrial mechanisms needed to fulfill the total obligations of that market economy must be clearly known, fully understood and actually put into place before that whole economy can expect to  work as a whole economy.

As market based economic development today in 2011 must include a most comprehensive understanding of all aspects of “emerging 21st century advanced energy management technologies”, unfortunately today in 2011, none of this is actually taking place. In scattered bits and pieces, in disjointed, politically one sided arguments for one type of energy technology and against another, the much larger and all conclusive non-argument must ultimately be acted upon. As all of these technologies make up the core mechanisms that must control and coordinate the growth of our whole 21st century, mixed energy use industrial infrastructure, they in turn make up the core mechanisms of the economic infrastructure that needs to be in place for that industrial infrastructure to be built in the first place. Simply put, we as a nation cannot, will not and should not expect any form of sustained economic growth until a broad and comprehensive re-industrialization initiative is put in place.

As what we are now learning about the Obama administration is that in spite of it’s otherwise very positive intentions pertaining to the development of alternative energy technologies, pursuing the collective growth of these technologies has been done through a very narrowly focused environmental and economic lense. Unfortunately, as that lense has been embellished by unnecessarily complex and one sided federal funding regulation, the vast array of new energy ideas that should be free to flourish unhindered by such over bearing economic constraints sit hopelessly dormant. Yet, regardless of whether those ideas are related to the advanced technological harvesting of energy from oil or the sun, the fact that any form of political or federal favoritism towards one energy sector as opposed to another exists, belies the larger point that all of these energy sectors must coexist at the very same level of advanced environmental and economic thought. We simply cannot have one without the other.

The failed upstart company Solyndra, funded almost exclusively by federal loan guarantees, not only did not produce the economic momentum clearly needed to launch our nation (and this company) into the forefront of global leadership in the “green energy sector”, but in turn, served to continue the great interpersonal political rift between democrats and republicans nationwide. As this rift is primarily about the role the federal government should play in nurturing the growth of new, green national energy policies, hand picking certain technologies (and companies) to fund while ignoring the potential of other technologies goes to the much larger issue that the federal government should not be in the business of selecting technologies to invest in but instead, be strictly and creatively and solely in charge of assuring that all technologies related to energy production are balanced in and of themselves so that “everyone else can invest in them”.

This essay is one of a series of essays designed to impart a rather complex nationwide industrial, economic and educational set of conversations. As these conversations are most certainly about assuring green energy technologies enter into our whole mixed energy use industrial marketplace, the manner in which they are able to do so is crucial to understand. Thus my essay on developing nationwide mixed energy use micro-public utility grids while at the same time developing mixed energy public transportation grids is part of this larger national conversation.

As public education is perhaps the most crucial aspect of our entire national energy dialogue, outlining and defining the framework of this public education dialogue is another essay.

As refunding (or refinancing) our national public education system is clearly needed, how mixed energy use, regionally based industrial regulation will allow for this funding to materialize is yet another essay. Finally, with our entire nationwide stock of homes, commercial and industrial buildings in need of substantial, highly technological, mixed energy use retrofitting, how will the establishment of truly substantive nationwide mixed energy building codes not only support a most sustainable/substantial nationwide building reconstruction initiative, but in turn create an unprecedented redefinition of both real property valuation and progressive mortgage lending based upon that 21st century real property valuation? You can find a link to this combined essay here.

As what must come about immediately in our whole national economic growth dialogue is an accompanying whole industrial dialogue as well as a whole public and private sector funding dialogue, I attempt in these essays to put something quite complex into defineably less complex terms.

 

self awareness

 

As the brilliance of Solyndra’s (CIGS) thin-film technology has been its ability to successfully convert energy from direct, diffuse and reflected sunlight into electricity over its 360-degree photovoltaic surface and that brilliance enables a broad spectrum of architectural applications throughout America, the unfortunately wrong conclusion on the part of the government was to place the economic potential of this particular technology into direct competition with the economic potential of flat silicone panels that fundamentally have an entirely different technological function as that function is applied to the same or different architectural applications throughout America.

In other words, just as oil is refined to meet the consumption needs of a vast array of industries and associated technologies, solar energy technology must also be refined to successfully compete and grow within its own energy sector as well as effectively merge with other energy sectors. Thus, for our government to be involved in any manner other than assuring these technologies are regulated for “basic truth in advertisement” within the much broader framework of how all energy technologies must be regulated to assure environmental and economic cohabitation is, in our 21st green industrial century, a virtual assault on the intelligence of all (corporations) who could and should be free to build and weave their multi-faceted (corporate) technologies into complex and highly sophisticated, regionally and locally based, multi-energy source public utility grids. As the only (and I might add substantially diverse) federal level regulatory control of these multi-dimensional utility grids is to assure a tremendously accurate, reliable rate of clean production, delivery, end use and recycled use and perpetual maintenance of the end corporate energy product and accompanying corporate service(s) related to such corporate product(s), the federal governments role must be solely that of a manager.

Getting back to Solyndra for a moment, and its’ brilliance in creating 360 degree solar generation and in turn viewing the brilliance of flat panel solar technology. The fact of the matter is this simple; virtually every home in America has a spot on its roof where 360 degree solar technology could be applied. In the same breath, virtually every home in America also has a spot on its roof where flat panel solar technology could be applied. This is not only true of solar technology, but it is equally true of natural gas technology as it is true of vertical axis wind turbine technology as it is true of horizontal axis wind turbine technology as it is true of multiple applications of geothermal technology. Regardless of the technology, virtually every home in America has a physical space within its architectural footprint that enables multiple uses of multiple energy technologies to interact collectively within that footprint. As this is true for every home, it is equally true for every retail storefront, every office building, distribution warehouse and every factory housed within any piece of architecture existing in our collective United States of America.

Having said this, If a virtual kaleidoscope of energy based public utility architectural technologies were applied to every piece of American architecture, an equally diverse kaleidoscope of new building trades would emerge to expand these public utility technologies into the private sector marketplace in the process. This is not a fanciful (or fantasy filled) statement. As at the core of this statement lies the root cause of our nations’ current housing and building industry economic collapse, it is perfectly clear to all who have any association whatsoever with these industries that American architecture by and large is at the very least, a redundant essay on the failure of our federal government to establish an advanced set of public utility blueprints that truly allow the building professionals of America to compete globally with their European and Asian counterparts when it comes to building state of the art, technologically advanced American architecture that wholly integrates 21st century energy management technologies into virtually every single one of our buildings.

As the dialogue here is about moving the technologies of a vast array of energy management theories into the realm of actualization – into the realm of the average American – into the realm of tangible investment potential – into the realm of doing as opposed to talking about doing, it is important to understand that micro-public utility models applied to American architecture or clusters of architectural buildings found in thousands of existing American sub or micro-neighborhoods that comprise larger towns or cities be understood as being the benchmark from which full and comprehensive mixed use energy infrastructure has the only real chance to grow and prosper.

With the great failure of the Obama administration to move virtually any form of green energy legislation forward and towards a relatively commonplace national economic dialogue and at a time when it is obvious to virtually every American that such legislative dialogue must indeed move forward, one has to ask why a supposedly intelligent collection of environmental, legal and financial experts have had virtually no impact on igniting the flame of free market excitement over the growth of green or indeed mixed use energy infrastructure here in our America in 2011.

An answer to this puzzling, mixed use energy policy conundrum is really quite simple.

As virtually every aspect of our nation’s energy/public utility infrastructure is now and has been growing more and more obsolete for the past fifty years, the notion of applying the technology Solyndra manufactures or the technology any other solar manufacturer offers to this utility infrastructure is most certainly doable and quite valid, but only within the constraints of it’s isolated technological capacity.

At the top end of our monolithic national energy/public utility pyramid remains of course an expected and (somewhat) reliable dependency upon fossil fuels, yet even with the most sound environmental, technological and economic management of fossil fuels, there are tremendous constraints on these energy sources as well. Yet attempting to integrate the green nature of solar, wind, geothermal and the like at this top end does virtually nothing to either environmentally or economically advance the greater potential of either fossil or green energy sources. Thus, the perpetual argument of all who represent a specific energy source as one that must compete with another energy source altogether fails to realize that within our collective 21st century industrial evolution, entirely new and dynamic economic opportunities arise when all energy sources are purposely isolated from one another and each energy source has very clearly defined parameters from which that energy source must function economically on it’s own before it is allowed vivid, technologically managed cohabitation with all other energy sources.

As the above model of deliberate isolation of energy sources has as it’s end goal the immediate and significant potential of creating wide spread and indeed massive consumer demand, the overarching reality of what today is being put forth to the American consumer via the Obama administration, which is the notion that eventually highly complex, federally funded and constructed public utility infrastructure will help them economically is entirely pointless.

Unfortunately, the reason why this incredibly narrow federally funded viewpoint is fundamentally pointless is the failure to realize that  as all of the additional components that make solar (or any other energy technology) work by itself or in integration with all other forms of energy production, generation, distribution and usage must first be installed not on a few acres of worthless California desert test grounds, but literally on the homes of  homeowners who live in virtually every environmental region of our United States of America, not only must this be done nationwide, but it must be done on a mass scale that includes virtually every piece of architecture located within that region before any industrial and/or economic and/or job growth in any energy sector and on any viable or measurable nationwide economic scale can or will be realized..

In other words, as the Obama administration has become obsessed with inventing the perfect green infrastructure model, it has done so on the premise that federal money will continue to fall quite magically from the sky and in doing so award the likes of upstart companies such as Solyndra with a set of wonderfully half ass federal funding initiatives and an equally half baked industrial recipe as to what Solyndra might actually be able to do with the meager amount of federal dollars the federal government actually has in it’s hopelessly in arrears, federal savings account. While this might sound humorous, the fact of the matter is infrastructure is infrastructure and with every generation of new technological invention that broadens the definition of infrastructure, the definition of how to finance whole infrastructure improvement becomes equally broad. But as we are now a nation poised to integrate a vast array of technologies that manage an equally vast array of energy sources, the manner in which we as a nation bring these technologies on line does not have to be as complicated as either futily waiting for two to three decades before solar cell technology is priced competitively with any other form of energy management technology or foolishly expecting the federal government to subsidize a particular energy sectors’ economic growth if and when either member of two redundantly opposed political parties agree. When all energy technologies are essentially public infrastructure technologies, they are as well public infrastructure utilities that when fully and properly structured can be invested in by the stockholders, employees and homeowners who are involved in the ultimate manufacturing, use and maintenance of this whole body of energy technologies right now, today, here in 2011 as opposed to some hopelessly obscure time in 2033.

In order to actually activate all of these energy technologies simultaneously, a strict code of multi-use energy discipline must be applied uniformly across the entire spectrum of energy sources now available to us in our whole United States of America. As no singular expert who works in any of multiple and varied and cumulatively dynamic energy sectors has ever really taken the time to actually look at how coal per se can interact with wind energy for the mutual benefit of both industries, the question becomes; what would such an ambitious 21st century energy blueprint look like if in fact someone actually did?

To tackle the question above, consider the possibility that such a scenario is really not all that difficult to figure out especially when we take the time to understand one basic engineering principle – “every energy source has it’s “economic melting point” or perhaps more precisely, it’s “environmental merging point with other sources of energy”.

The technology of solar can only go so far in it’s capacity to sustain “collective energy co-efficiency” before recognizing it’s need for help from a much larger family of energy sources.

As it is virtually impossible for solar energy technology to produce enough electrical generation to consistently provide all of the power needed to truly operate all of the electrical devices found within a truly advanced technology 21st century home, it is economically counter productive to assume that natural gas or any other individual fossil fuel source can or should be able to do the same. As it is (due to constantly fluctuating temperature) virtually impossible for solar energy to provide the year round passive or active heating needs of a home in Vermont, it is economically redundant to assume that natural gas or fuel oil or propane can do any better in and of itself(s). Yet once the two energy sources are combined, they immediately produce a much more non stressful energy and economic environment for one another as well as the consumer who lives in that home. If natural gas knows that solar will relieve it’s energy load and vice a versa within the architectural footprint of any given building, excess capacity from either energy source can be diverted to other buildings that are perhaps experiencing either more or less energy stress. This economic cohabitation of multiple energy sources is then the measure of where each energy source reaches it’s negative economic melting point and thus meets it’s proactive economic and environmental merging point with other sources of energy.

As the greatest industrial and economic as well environmental calamity in our nation’s early 21st industrial century is clearly thus far, the obsessive socially oriented bickering among our collective experts in hopelessly separated and nationally estranged environmental and energy fields and as the cause for such bickering is fundamentally about who is bigger and better, who is environmentally conscious and who is not and/or who (in quite the absurd fashion) is more morally bound to idealisms that mean virtually nothing to our nation’s much larger and urgent 21st century industrial imperative, who or what ideal (they represent?) will get the most federal funding to improve their or its’ isolated vision of individual infrastructure is then, meaningless.  But, as single source energy infrastructure development is proving quite clearly to be well beyond the funding capacity of either the private or public sector, multi-source energy infrastructure development simply eliminates our national counter-productive and indeed industrially negative emotional response to these funding problems while at the same time, generates an enormously broad social momentum devoted entirely to multi-source energy sector job creation.

In both the manufacturing sectors charged with producing and the on site construction sectors associated with installing “multiple energy sector technologies”, the greater and historically positive and progressive American industrial social principle of “economic co-habitation” or simple “United American Industrial Teamwork” remains as the benchmark from which we as all Americans can all actually turn our now misguided and negative industrial emotions into a vast array of clearly positive emotional and economic outcomes. In addition, this same cohabitating set of industrial principles leads directly to technological management of information technologies required to produce multiple energy sector coordination in every bit the same manner as it leads to the direct establishment of both public and private sector education and training models.

To put the above paragraph into perspective, please consider this:

While natural gas is clearly one of the cleanest fossil fuels on (or inside of) our planet, getting that natural gas via pipeline from where it is drilled and where it is used is quite costly in and of itself. But, the moment the cost associated with the installation of that pipeline is shared by the cost of installing the infrastructure of solar, wind and geothermal, multi-capacity infrastructure development turns immediately to multi-capacity job creation and multi-capacity investment and investment return in and from the multi-capacity infrastructure being installed.

When one really thinks about the above statement for awhile, it is easy to realize that the capacity we as a nation have to benefit financially from such infrastructure co-development is virtually astounding. Thinking just for a moment about the single goal of installing the single infrastructure for a single source of energy all across America, think about this. How many household appliances actually require the consumption of natural gas? The answer is relatively simple, there is the furnace needed for heating our homes, the dryer for drying clothes, the hot water tank we retrieve water to bathe in and the stove and oven needed for cooking our food. That’s about it. Yet, the very moment we place an entirely new technological need for natural gas into our broader national mixed use energy equation, an entirely new definition of mixed use energy infrastructure emerges.

Obviously in our nation’s current economic environment, very few homeowners can either afford to replace their old energy inefficient furnace anymore than they can afford to replace their ancient clothes dryer or stove and oven or water tank. Even if Americans nationwide were living in an economy that was thriving, the fact of the matter is that upgrading the furnace or the clothes dryer does not justify the cost associated with constructing a nationwide natural gas infrastructure to supply the fuel needed for these appliances to actually do their job. The simple math of diminishing returns simply applies and as it does, in no time, it becomes abundantly clear that natural gas development does not in the end, pay for itself without enormous federal government subsidizing. As too much government subsidizing of virtually every energy sector(including green as in “Solyndra”) has already brought our nation to a virtual economic halt, it is fairly obvious that buying furnaces and clothes dryers designed to operate solely on either natural gas or electric probably won’t solve any of the varied and massive structural economic problems facing our nation here at the close of 2011.

So, if federal funding of separate or “single source” public utility energy infrastructure isn’t working, what might be the outcome if instead of a too narrowly focused federal policy on public utility infrastructure funding, federal regulation of a truly mixed use national energy policy were to be put in place?

If, instead of the federal government buying into or showing undue favoritism towards a particular new energy technology all energy technologies were properly placed into new and dynamic micro models of public utility infrastructure, what would the overall economic outcome be on the one hand, and, on the other, what would such an advanced 21st Century Industrial Infrastructure Blueprint actually look like?

Let me suggest the following:

If we know (and we do) that production and distribution of natural gas has a limited economic shelf life within the constraints of our twentieth century single use industrial and economic infrastructure model as that model pertains to supplying this gas to our nation’s immense collection of buildings that make up neighborhoods, towns and cities, what happens when within our 21st century infrastructure model, natural gas is freed up to leave home?

The answer to this question is really quite exciting.

Knowing (as we do) that virtually no one in America can continue to afford to purchase appliances powered by natural gas without also being employed in the industries that manufacture natural gas appliances, the answer to the question above clearly becomes a threefold question in and of itself;

Question Number One

When and how does a stationary natural gas appliance grow wheels?

Question Number Two

When that natural gas appliance leaves the homeowners garage on wheels, does that vehicle enter into the realm of new public utility transportation infrastructure?

Question Number Three

If the infrastructure is on wheels, then doesn’t it appear somewhat obvious that we as a nation have created a substantially new public highway improvement funding mechanism?

I will explore my version of these questions in my next essay entitled:

FROM ROOFTOP SOLAR TO ROADWAY ASPHALT

Our Next American

Public Utility

Infrastructure Model

 

Thanks for stopping by,

self awareness

Mike Patrick Dahlke

Curriculum vitae

Sailing Lessons

Please take the time to visit some of my other essays.

Transforming Redundant Affirmative Action To Green Affirmative Action In America

Interior Urban Networks And Sustainable Chicago 2015

Restructuring Public Utility Industrial Demand Response

How To Build An Organic Grain Bin

Urban Planning: The Fine Art Of Attaching Organic Belly Buttons

American Housing, The Bird On A Wire In 2015

The Real Flint, Michigan Water Pipeline

Into Chicago, Making Neighborhoods Economically Green.

Advancing America’s Green Electric Metering Infrastructure

When Green Dollars Go Nowhere, They’re Probably Not Green “The True Nature of Secular Stagnation.”

The National Movement toward Green Urban Renewal Takes a Turn to the Country to Pick Up a Few Things.

Establishing True Green Market Valuation of America’s Non Green Housing Stock

How To Heat An American Sidewalk

The Birth of 21st Century Housing, Transportation and Public Utility Infrastructure Corporations

Establishing A Sustainable 21st Century, Regionally Based Nationwide Housing Finance System.

Painting A Typical American Town Green

Building Green Community Banks With Green Building Codes

How National Building Codes Will Bridge America’s Intelligence Gap.

Financing Our Mixed Energy Use, 21st Century Public Education Imperative

Public and Private Sector Education and Training Models For Our 21st Century, Mixed Energy Use Industrial Economy

Micro – Urban Infrastructure, Blending Predictions With Planning in 2017

  Micro – Urban Infrastructure   Blending Predictions With Planning in 2017   Mapping Power Customers From Highly Blueprinted Micro Grids. Aligning Manufacturing Companies With Advanced Building Trade Sectors. The Public Utility Market Meets The Private Mortgage Industry.   Mike Patrick Dahlke   Mapping Power Customers From Highly Blueprinted Micro Grids.   What will determine the make up […]

 

Micro – Urban Infrastructure

 

micro urban infrastructure

Blending Predictions With Planning in 2017

 

Mapping Power Customers From Highly Blueprinted Micro Grids.
Aligning Manufacturing Companies With Advanced Building Trade Sectors.
The Public Utility Market Meets The Private Mortgage Industry.

 

Mike Patrick Dahlke

 

Mapping Power Customers From Highly Blueprinted Micro Grids.

 

What will determine the make up of a broad range of energy fields in 2017?

Will the structural blueprinting that has taken place in numerous energy sectors over the course of the last several years finally enable the masses to benefit from the technologies developed for the masses?

Does the year 2017 have a particular relevance to the inoculation of these technologies into our entire industrial economy?

For some very odd reason, the year of 2017 does seem to have a certain sense of urgency attached to it. If for no other reason than it signifies the first year in many that hopelessly over educated Democrats are no longer in control of any aspect of our federal government and we have a president who seems to have been educated solely on the concept of business belligerency, 2017 appears to be the year from which all concepts of energy management, all concepts of environmental stewardship and all theories of economic development as that development pertains to rebuilding all aspects of our nation’s power, transportation and financial infrastructure must come to some rather obvious and fluid form of manifestation.

In other words, 2017 does seem to be the year that all talk finally stops and progress by leaps and bounds finally smothers the mouths of a small army of babbling idiots who have attempted to rule our economy much more by a hopelessly detached sense of fantasy rather than a purposefully functioning model of full energy interactivity. Yes, 2017 is the year to which we all now turn to to cognitively embrace the fully attainable notion of building a nation of fully integrated micro-grids. As it is and anyone who has been working in the fields mentioned above is chomping at the bit to finally take the ball and run with it, key elements of key industries remain somewhat disconnected from one another. Because of this, even though 2017 will clearly be a year of enormous progress in several energy sectors, the underlying blueprint from which all energy sectors can effectively and fluidly commingle remains somewhat sketchy.

For those of you who have followed my writing on the subject of total urban planning over the course of the last eight years, you will note that my continued emphasis on the clear and cohesive development of regional based model building codes from which every other form of economic structural retooling must occur, remains the benchmark of my theory. In essence, and, quite simply, neither an individual homeowner, a municipality, a public utility, a public or private transportation entity or even a kid on a simple bicycle can benefit financially from the development of a truly advanced energy infrastructure model if the houses we live in are not governed by a set of building codes that ultimately determine the economic livelihood of the occupants living in that house.

Having said the above, this essay revues the writings of several people in key energy sectors who have made predictions for and are bringing forward plans to continue to grow the technologies that represent their particular energy field in 2017. With the purpose of doing so being to point out what I consider to be certain flaws in either the theory or the blueprint for the execution of the theory associated with a particular technology, this essay is not meant to attack the methodology of a given energy expert as much as it is to bring forth a that much more substantial discussion as to how a given technology could be integrated into the whole of our emerging national micro-grid model even further if the technology of one energy sector were fully wedded to the technology of another energy sector, or, even more so, how the technology of one energy sector could enable an entirely separate green industry to unfold by connecting seemingly unconnected dots from several sectors together to form new urban industrial economic links in the process.

I am going to start this essay looking at the development of solar roofing shingles and the larger concept of building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) . In my view, the solar roofing nergy product sector has in particular the potential to become a rather significant economic link to a wide array of seemingly unrelated industrial functions as those functions do, in and of themselves address key elements of energy use management that would more than likely not be considered as related to the solar industry, but, in fact are. As it is important to note here that solar in general has somewhat of an awkward fit into today’s traditional energy grid and that awkwardness points primarily to the fact that solar only produces power during the day when in many cases demand is less, storing that power for evening use (in particular for residential applications) is today in 2017 considered to being the key to the successful integration of solar on a widespread community by community micro-grid level. As such, addressing the peripheral economic relationships the solar roofing shingle should have with the entirety of the roofing industry is the key.

With the advent of the advanced technology solar roofing shingle, one thing in particular has the potential to occur to the whole of the roofing industry. That one thing is the high level of customization required of each individual roof within a community micro-architectural cluster of homes that occupy the geographical footprint of a predetermined community solar grid. A case in point here is the customization of one particular roof that can be retrofitted to within a specific square foot percentage to actually house solar roofing shingles on it. As the solar shingle capacity of that one roof has been predetermined by the accurately engineered solar energy need and production capacity of every home within a predetermined cluster of homes, the determination of both solar generation and storage along with monitored consumption and disbursement has also been determined. Thus any given house on any given block within any given micro solar grid framework already has a list of solar assets attached to it’s energy grid participation index EGPI (if you will). Grasping the concept of a given homes EGPI then is crucial to understanding the relationship the solar roofing shingle has with the roofing industry as well as any other solar technology that may or may not be placed upon a roof or attached to the whole architectural footprint of a home within a whole community solar micro-grid of equally assessed homes.

If it is known that only 400 square feet of a 4,000 square foot roof surface can be dedicated to solar generation, it is then, also known that the remainder of that roof surface has to be covered by materials designed to capture passive solar daily heat gain via engineered heat storage and then disperse that heat gain evenly throughout the evening when solar electric storage is also being dispersed. As the combination of roofing materials is then the perfect medium from which solar energy is optimized, it is as well the perfect medium for economic growth in several industrial sectors that without such a comprehensive dialogue would not have the potential for long term economic growth if in fact they were viewed as either separate or competing industrial entities. Thus, as a result of this holistic solar engineering, a significant percentage of traditional American roofs currently covered in non organic and energy efficient petroleum based roofing shingles that have little to nothing whatsoever to do with anything even remotely associated with solar energy or the economy forming around placement of solar, the symbiotic relationship between the combination of passive solar heat gain and storage and active solar electrical energy gain and storage begins to merge quite smoothly with what obviously is the same industrial evolution taking place in the non fuel based production of advanced energy roofing systems.

While all of this is quite fascinating in theory, the fact of the matter is that neither the roofing industry nor the solar industry will find any significant form of long term sustainability in terms of overall economic growth until what it is I have described above is indeed put into practice. As both of these industries are essentially universally connected to one another, that connectivity goes even farther once the true structural blueprint of residential solar application and residential roofing application in conjoined to the delivery mechanisms associated with installing either solar shingles or traditional shingles onto a given roof not to mention a cluster of given roofs within the geographical blueprint of a community solar garden model.

A case in point for the above mentioned interactivity between the roofing and solar industry has to do with the industrial transportation needs required to deliver new product, remove and recycle old product and/or to service and maintain advanced energy rooftop systems within a community solar micro-grid. Just as interesting to grasp as it is as well entirely foolish to ignore, attaching the industrial transportation need of the roofing industry to the whole residential retrofit sustainability mix brings into play both EV charging and storage technology as well as LNG and CNG fueling station modeling of the roofing industry transportation fleet not to mention the personal transportation needs of the micro-grid based residential homeowner.

Whereas what I am describing is clearly a fairly complicated integration of a broad host of industries into the community solar garden model, all of the technology required to do so clearly exists just as the advanced metering infrastructure AMI technology to monitor all of these industrial interactions exist as well meaning that all that is lacking is the structural framework to make all of this happen.

Skipping past the solar roofing shingle discussion for a minute and focusing on AMI and the potential this technology has to fully transform the structural framework of our nation’s public utility model, there are a number of technologies that along with the solar roofing shingle are in 2017 poised to reach a level of structural maturity that will bring the entire understanding of our public utility model into a much sharper and clearer focus enabling in the process a certain sense of economic confidence to take over. To the point where the discussion over who is president, what political party runs either the house or the senate, or what if anything even remotely related to legislative common sense comes out of Washington DC any time in the next eight years is absolutely meaningless, the technologies I speak about below are in fact the technologies that will virtually run our economy in spite of any attempt by any political party to alter their collective ability to do so. Yet even as these technologies are poised to reshape our entire national public electric and public transportation grid, none of them will do anything well if in fact they are not utilized to integrate the seemingly meaningless concept of industrial cross training or industrial cross breading from within the framework I mentioned above and that must coexist between industrial sectors that are currently viewed as being either entirely unrelated to one another, or, as I’ve said before, competitively at odds with one another for virtually no good or rational economic reason whatsoever.

James McPhail, CEO of Zen Ecosystems; Adrian Tuck, CEO of Tendril and Will Greene, product management, energy and safety services at Nest are each operating companies that are now and will more than likely continue to clearly provide the high tech management of energy information required of truly advanced energy engineered residential architecture well into the future. As each of these men and their companies have products designed to process and share energy information with a broad host of entities that could conceivably benefit from this information, each of the technologies these three companies represent more or less address the same need to process energy information. Having said this, the likelihood of one or more of these companies to fail financially within just the next few years is rather substantial due exclusively to the fact that the information being acquired and being shared by others who can manage this information for financial gain diminishes rapidly if that information is not used to grow new industries or connect existing industries to technologies that expand substantially a given industrial sector’s market reach.

The ZEN Thermostat offers it’s consumer base a broad range of information management and gathering amenities all of which are essentially designed to save the thermostat user money on energy use over the course of time. In turn, TENDRIL’S My Home offers the user the first mobile application to unify utility programs into a single, personalized interface”. The problem with both of the products being offered by these two companies is that, for all practical purposes, their products are nothing more than basic thermostats connected to basic cell phones to connect information with basic information providers who are for the most part not even remotely connected to any of the energy industries that are also supposed to be being built into the architectural footprint of any given advanced energy engineered home found on a modern, neighborhood based micro-grid. As I am not trying to pick on these two companies any more than I am trying to pick apart the technologies of NEST and it’s Nest Thermostat, the point is clear, a thermostat only tells the temperature of a space. And, until all of the technologies needed of that space to both produce and manage the energy related to that space are intact the potential of market failure of these three information systems remains substantial.

On another hand however, John Carrington, CEO of Stem offers up one of the very product systems that justifies the growth or expansion of the smart thermostat into entirely new markets.

Stem works with leading utilities and grid service providers to harness our aggregated storage network as a cost-competitive, controllable and fast-acting capacity resources in a way that generates new value streams to utilities”.

Customer-sited storage is a powerful resource that delivers reliable services to the grid while helping customers shape their loads for the benefit of the grid”.

The above quotes are taken directly from STEM’s website and are focused exclusively on what Stem actually does which is to produce the energy storage platforms that should be in place in every piece of residential architecture in America to one extent or another nationwide and on a very much regionally specific model building code that allows all participants of any energy segment associated with the retrofitting of existing architecture the ability to do so from within a clearly written advanced regulatory building code enforcement framework.

Another quote from STEM’s website: “Visibility and control to the grid edge”; Using Stem’s PowerMonitors, operators gain precise visibility behind the customer’s meter or on distribution lines. Stem’s PowerScope software enables visibility and control into Stem’s fleet of energy storage devices” – sums up the potential of advanced thermostat technology working in unison with equally advanced storage technology to produce the residential market for advanced building-automation via advanced building trade skills development.

With the issue being one one hand a combination of managing energy produced by building owner groups and submetering companies, the larger issue is the sheer proliferation of all energy sectors once all building trades are fully informed of all energy technologies capable of being integrated into a given micro-grid.

 

State Energy Policies in 2017

Aligning Manufacturing Companies With Advanced Building Trade Sectors.

With policy for renewables and distributed generation set at the state level, it goes without saying that every state is currently undergoing a substantial review of anything to do with energy policy. As such, leaders in all energy fields are awaiting multiple levels of guidance from state regulators in order to once and for all move these sectors into the common core of energy policy and the common dialogue of what should be every day and ordinary discussion of best business practices as that discussion pertains to infrastructure expansion.

As the traditional drivers of infrastructure additions were load growth and connecting distant generation sources to population centers, today load growth is relatively minimal whereas conversations over connecting distant generation sources to local energy need are clearly being supplanted with comprehensive micro-grid dialogue. With the above being the case and renewables clearly being looked upon as critical to meeting residential electric power demand, the notion of transporting electric power long distances is being replaced by the notion of transporting people short distances instead. With residential power load being managed to the point of efficiency never before seen in the industry and consumer habits about both conserving and micro managing power dominant across our nation, moving people about as opposed to moving power to people is just as an important issue as the power needed to do so.

EV technology, LNG and CNG technologies are all therefore critical areas of discussion in that we now have technology that entirely alters our presumptions of how to fuel vehicular traffic. As such, we also have an entirely new perspective on travel. As that perspective is increasingly about how to get from place to place within our own communities, it is as well about what it is we need in our communities to live the less long range mobile lifestyle many in our nation are coming to demand of their communities. Why go far when near can and should be much better?

With this ideology in mind, understanding the structural relationship between the energy sectors that are poised to power our nation’s urban transit model with the energy sector poised to power our nation’s residential energy model is paramount as one simply will not and more to the point cannot exist without the other.

To the point where concerns over the loss of baseload power that roiled organized markets around the country in 2016 will become more acute in 2017 this issue will be fully resolved once a comprehensive understanding between residential energy application and transportation based energy application has been had. As such, the dynamic that needs to be understood is precisely how power generation for these two separate sectors is designed as both a rate creator for the fulfillment of transportation based infrastructure improvements as well as a rate creator for the same infrastructure improvements of the electric grid as well as other grid systems such as municipal rainwater and storm water management. Once the rate structure is in place concerns over the shuttering of old fossil fuel plants or the bankruptcy of poorly managed utility providers will be replaced by the much more fluid structures outlined above. Either way the natural evolution of all energy technologies once caught up with the natural evolution of all financing technologies will make the definition of power distribution from either a long distant region to region distribution standpoint or a localized micro-grid generation and/or storage/distribution standpoint quite valid.

With the key to this type of long range transmission planning being a firm understanding of DERs and the interconnectivity of distributed energy resources to and with the building trades within multiple municipalities within a given state, at the present time due exclusively to the fact that an electrician doing business in one community that does perhaps house a decidedly more educated population than another community in the same state, that educated electrician is at a distinct economic disadvantage. Due to the fact that once he attempts to expand his electrical business to another community only to find the consumer base and labor base is virtually clueless to the technology he is an expert at installing, he, because of his advanced knowledge of DERs remains financially constricted to the smart community while the stupidity of the neighboring community brings down the entire state’s economic performance in otherwise viable DER markets. While all of this might sound a bit ludicrous, the fact of the matter is that without statewide model building codes, without comprehensive statewide alternative transportation regulatory knowledge and without comprehensive statewide policy on neighborhood micro-grid development, the state and virtually every industry in the state is at a fundamental risk of economic collapse due to the fact that the state is operating without a tangible infrastructure model in the first place.

 

Back to the Solar Roofing Shingle

The Public Utility Market Meets The Private Mortgage Industry.

Regardless of opinion, solar energy is at the core of all future industrial growth in our America. Due simply to the fact that virtually every building built has solar gain potential attached to it somewhere within it’s architectural footprint and that solar gain transformed to either heat or energy storage fully alters, or, much more to the point, fully celebrates the fact that our entire American industrial society has simply evolved.

Solar engineering knowledge is as common place as the knowledge surrounding waking up in the morning. More specifically, solar energy can be demonstrated to anyone by simply sitting on a picnic table outside on a cold but sunny winter day without gloves on. Regardless of where you place your hands on that table, one hand will eventually become either warmer or colder than the other due simply to the arc of the sun as it transverses the surface of the table while you sit there as well as the fact that one hand will block the rays of the sun from getting to the other if both hands are left immobile. Once however the hands begin to work in unison with one another, one hand might reach for an item to help block the prevailing wind blowing across the surface of the table while the other will reach for something to insulate both hands from the rising dampness coming from the ground beneath the picnic table. The moment both hands reach for an advanced packet of DERs however, the earth, the picnic table and the body attached to the hands sitting at the picnic table are not only warm but fully capable of holding the dollar bills generated by the mind attached to the body to invest in the infrastructure that makes it all possible in the first place.

Solar energy is simply here to stay. As such, determining whether or not this energy sector has the possibility to generate as much electrical current as fossil fuels is neither here nor there. What is important therefore is to redefine what we consider as baseload, or, more to the point what we consider as being highly task specific groupings of multiple baseloads that are strategically placed geographically around the picnic table to enhance the energy, environmental and economic performance of the people sitting at the table.

The key to advanced energy growth in 2017 remains as it has been, state and much more specifically, local decision making that is designed to substantially expose via comprehensive community based education, the remarkably broad application of DERs into the advanced socioeconomic framework of each and every neighborhood in each and every community statewide and in all fifty states nationwide This can happen rapidly if something equally dynamic begins to take place within the context of fully developing a neighborhood based micro-grid economy. With the something I am speaking about being a combination of a whole and total before and after energy audit of a residential property via the traditional mortgage application, such before and after knowledge would serve the community banking community in every bit the comprehensive manner as it would serve the service sector and manufacturing entities that do business within that community not to mention all public utility providers whose collective potential for realizing a substantial rate of return on a collective body of distributed energy resources is virtually nil without that before and after energy audit.

If all a given homeowner has to do is walk into a local real estate office to view a list of properties that suite his or her’s physical architectural needs, view a complete photo gallery of that properties physical assets while in turn viewing a complete before and after energy performance profile of that dwelling only to simply walk down the street to the local lender to qualify a mortgage based upon that homeowner’s intention to architectural improve that dwelling over time?

This is not in any manner a wayward and abstract thought. In fact, what I have just described is a classically and historically accurate scenario to the path to home ownership, ongoing home improvement planning, continued community development, continuous updating of fair market residential real estate value of constantly improved real residential property neighborhood wide. reliable assessments of public utility billings, exposure to a well educated and well funded community school district and access to a broad host of retail, service and manufacturing based business entities that thrive in that neighborhood due simply to exposure to advanced DER based environmental consciousness not to mention a AAA bond rating for that whole micro-grid based neighborhood of real and fully functioning neighbors.

 

Thanks for stopping by.

self awareness

Mike Patrick Dahlke

 

Curriculum vitae

Sailing Lessons

 

Please take the time to visit some of my other essays.

Transforming Redundant Affirmative Action To Green Affirmative Action In America

Interior Urban Networks And Sustainable Chicago 2015

Restructuring Public Utility Industrial Demand Response

How To Build An Organic Grain Bin

Urban Planning: The Fine Art Of Attaching Organic Belly Buttons

American Housing, The Bird On A Wire In 2015

The Real Flint, Michigan Water Pipeline

Into Chicago, Making Neighborhoods Economically Green.

Advancing America’s Green Electric Metering Infrastructure

When Green Dollars Go Nowhere, They’re Probably Not Green “The True Nature of Secular Stagnation.”

The National Movement toward Green Urban Renewal Takes a Turn to the Country to Pick Up a Few Things.

Establishing True Green Market Valuation of America’s Non Green Housing Stock

How To Heat An American Sidewalk

The Birth of 21st Century Housing, Transportation and Public Utility Infrastructure Corporations

Establishing A Sustainable 21st Century, Regionally Based Nationwide Housing Finance System.

Painting A Typical American Town Green

Building Green Community Banks With Green Building Codes

How National Building Codes Will Bridge America’s Intelligence Gap.

Financing Our Mixed Energy Use, 21st Century Public Education Imperative

Public and Private Sector Education and Training Models For Our 21st Century, Mixed Energy Use Industrial Economy

Advancing America’s Green Electric Metering Infrastructure

  America’s Advanced Metering Infrastructure Model Mike Patrick Dahlke   The buzz coming from our nation’s public electric utility grid here in 2017 is not the one that would generally be heard say if you were traveling down a rural Kansas farm road and happened to pass beneath the electrical transmission lines while drinking beer […]

 

America’s

Advanced Metering Infrastructure Model

amitwo

Mike Patrick Dahlke

 

The buzz coming from our nation’s public electric utility grid here in 2017 is not the one that would generally be heard say if you were traveling down a rural Kansas farm road and happened to pass beneath the electrical transmission lines while drinking beer and piloting your vintage 1957 Chevy Apache Step Side pick up truck past wheat fields in mid July.

As that Kansas buzz has a very specific high tension tone to it, the buzz I’m talking about today in 2017 is the buzz going on in the engineering and bookkeeping offices of every industry having anything whatsoever to do with the entire reconstruction of our nation’s electric grid. As within this conversation today there are not only an enormous amount of technologies, regulations and energy sources themselves that have to be neatly woven into the fabric of our nation’s obviously aging electric grid, there is the singular most important conversation of cost to be included in that dialog as well.

With the key to cost management essentially wrapped around the ability any electric utility provider has to track the entire path of its electrical current from the moment the current is generated to the moment it is consumed, utilizing Smart Metering Infrastructure is pretty much the consensus tool of choice when it comes to doing so. As these meters are slowly making their way into homes across America, the pace in which this is being done is unfortunately, directly associated with the cost of the smart meter, the time and labor involved with installing the meter and the sheer volume of homes as well as buildings of all types that exist across America that of course, need the meter to begin with. Having said the above, the question becomes twofold; how many years or decades is such an endeavor going to take, and, can the process be brought up to a much faster and more efficient rate of installation if in fact a variety of other equally important American public utility based upgrades were addressed simultaneously?

As the big conversation in today’s public electric utility sector is centering around the incorporation of renewables into the existing framework of our national electric grid, and, smart metering is considered the mechanism from which all of this integration will eventually be enabled, the associated technologies of both solar and wind energy are currently being reviewed not only for their electrical generation attributes, but a host of other electrical providership needs particular to their technologies, or more specifically, to the mobility or whole regulatory segmentation of their interchangeable technologies. Both solar and wind energy can be picked up and moved just as easily as these technologies can be left in place for extended periods of time. Either way, as electrical storage capacity is considered by many as being crucial to the multi faceted success of both wind and solar, any combination of electrical co generation, or storage, really only works if in fact the management of such capacity is itself managed by Advanced Metering Infrastructure.

Yet before infrastructure can be fully managed by advanced metering technologies, infrastructure itself must be fully defined. With this being the case, answering the initial question of how many other equally important American public utility needs can or should be upgraded simultaneously (in conjunction with updating our electric grid) must then be the determining factor from which the full blueprint of the infrastructure definition being sought is in fact found.

To grasp the sheer scope of this endeavor, I have designed a series of charts that I think will help in the general conceptualization of the public utility blueprint I have mentioned above and continue to frame below. Before getting to these charts however, I think a careful assessment of the key regulatory elements currently being considered as being benchmarks from which this utility blueprint to move forward, must be adhered to, is needed.

Energy Efficient Architecture And Evenly Applied Local, Regional and Statewide Building Codes.

 

Energy Efficient Architecture can, in its simplest terminology, be summed up as the ability the homeowner has to do things to their personal architectural environment that will enhance the overall energy conservation of a particular dwelling.

Within the process of doing so, it has, up until the nationwide financial collapse of the housing market, been more or less assumed that an individual homeowner can, either through the efforts of their own physical labor, or, by hiring “professional contractors” make some rather “economically adolescent” energy improvements to their dwelling, and, in doing so, being able to state that in terms of resale valuation, that home is more up to par environmentally and economically than the house next door. Whereas again this more or less sophomoric ideological interpretation of energy efficient architecture inspired our nation as a whole to go out and purchase a few roles of fiberglass insulation and another few energy efficient appliances, all of this was done without even for a moment realizing that every piece of municipal infrastructure going into that residential dwelling was in such a dire need of upgrading, that even if virtually every homeowner in every community were to simply install fiberglass batts while cooking on the coolest new stove on the planet, that infrastructure would still be in the same state of both mechanical and economic collapse.

Knowing this then is sufficient enough reason to ask what in fact the establishment of truly multi dimensional building codes plays not only on the improvement of the whole of our municipal infrastructure, but, the subsequent approach to real property valuation as well as the growth of an educated building trade work force has on both.

As again, currently in our nation, the emphasis on integrating renewable electrical generation technologies into our national electric grid seems to be the general theme, thus far that theme is as relevant economically today in our America as installing fiberglass insulation was prior to the economic collapse of our housing industry. But, as Advanced Metering Infrastructure has the capacity again to elevate the whole of municipal utility infrastructure, surprisingly, neither wind or solar, or, insulation of any form, really has the ability to fully enhance the overall economic model needed to be implemented into the whole of our infrastructure model. Whereas all three are clearly essential, another of several equally renewable energy technologies stands somewhat obscurely at the economic sidelines of our nationwide infrastructure development potential.

With that technology being geothermal energy, and, as geothermal energy cannot in and of itself be considered as being a renewable energy source in and of itself, once the technologies of geothermal (and, several other equally renewable energy system technologies) are fully integrated into our national electric (or whole mixed energy) infrastructure grid via the substantial help of Advanced Metering Infrastructure, the structural industrial and economic fluidity of geothermal melds equally with the fluidity of true renewable energy sources (solar and wind) in every bit the same manner as it does as well meld with traditional main frame electrical generating technologies. As the larger issue here is, of course, that there are virtually no traditional energy sources left in our America today, and the myth that such technologies still exist is wholly financially redundant, geothermal in particular is one energy harvesting technology that has, within its dynamic mechanical framework, perhaps the most architecturally significant capacity to act as one of the structural, building code based benchmarks I mentioned above.

To be quite specific, and, in the process address yet another crucial element of rebuilding our national infrastructure grid, geothermal energy has, within its overall mechanical capacity, certain regionally constraining structural parameters. Whereas I would suggest that a significant nationwide geographical area would of course benefit from the inoculation of geothermal heat pumps into and out of either individual buildings or neighborhood based building clusters for the dual purpose of both heating and cooling the structures contained within such a regional footprint, powering these heat pumps with electricity as opposed to powering HVAC heating technologies with electricity while also fueling HVAC with natural gas, clearly from within a regionally economic and energy efficient standard suggests geothermal over natural gas in a heart beat.

None the less, to suggest for some reason that a building should not be piped for natural gas is as ridiculous as suggesting that a building should not be insulated, the multi dimensional function of natural gas as well as the multidimensional function of stationary electrical storage as that storage pertains to the successful integration of all aspects of solar generation storage capacity brings into this discussion, both the mobility of all energy sources in general as well as again, the need for comprehensive Advanced Metering Integration to begin with.

 

Energy Efficient Architecture – What exactly does Advanced Metering Integration Imply?

In this first chart then is a picture of a typical American house that is connected to the larger national energy grid I have outlined above via AMI technology.

amihouse

Just as I have stated above, once another energy (geothermal for instance) technology is integrated into the whole of all energy based infrastructure technologies, the “system”, if you will, begins the rather dynamic and exciting industrial as well as regulatory process of financially fleshing itself out. As essentially all of what we are doing when integrating a broad host of energy sources into the shell of any given American home is putting meat on the bones of a far too skinny “public electric utility grid” model, we are doing the same with our “natural gas utility grid” that is in some cases creating that electricity to begin with, while in other cases, needlessly stands alone as its’ own efficient, but, somewhat ancient public utility providership model. Whereas alone these two utility models have historically sustained us economically, once both are truly and systemically fleshed out, the outcome will be the capacity of both of these utility models to produce the long term economic food for the tens of thousands of new workers potentially employable in the emerging, multi-segmented energy industries we have had at our creative advanced industrial disposal for several decades, but, for overall lack of systemic connectivity, have become needlessly sidelined due to overwhelming systemic redundancy. Thus again it is Advanced Metering Infrastructure that finally enables all of us to get on with the collective task of rebuilding our nation’s whole infrastructure.

Looking more closely at the above chart, you’ll notice “vehicle EV metering” and “vehicle CNG metering”. The most exciting aspect of these two Advanced Metering Infrastructure models is very much new and very much long term and substantial utility rate generation that is, for all practical purposes, entirely separate from any rate model associated with either existing electric or existing natural gas rate providership structures as such rate structures apply to architectural dwellings as well as overall transportation based fueling function and transportation based infrastructure funding, once such stationary utilities become fully mobile in both their electric and natural gas evolutionary public utility function. With this being the case, and, in fact both of the above mentioned vehicle based fueling models see metering functions as again mobile, or, transit oriented in function, they should be transit oriented in regulatory authority as well. Why this should be so is simple, although such vehicles might very well be fueled at an individuals home, once these vehicles are in motion, they and the vehicles inhabitants are utilizing the roads leading to and away from those homes to conduct business or commerce if you will upon the roadways leading to and from their own private doorstep.

Having stated the above and going back to the chart above, the question becomes, what of any of the energy technologies that are now affixed to an individual home can be affixed to or along the roadway said vehicles travel on as well?

As the answer here is essentially all 21st century energy generating or management technologies found in a 21st century home can and should be embedded into the roads that service that home, again the rate structures and rate revenues found from within Advanced Metering Infrastructure are both diverse and enormous as well as being quite sustainable for the long foreseeable energy future of our nation’s entire utility infrastructure network only if such structures are applied financially to the highway transportation funding mechanisms that unfortunately today are very much unfundable due to the overall obsolescence of 20th century infrastructure symmetry in the first place.

The next chart begins to explain what it is that I mean.

amithree

As again, the moment we look upon energy management for what it actually is today in our 21st century, we find a remarkable array of energy based industrial entities to fill the clearly overwhelming financial infrastructure funding void that is all but stopping the long term sustainable growth of every other industry that relies on such infrastructure to thrive, taking a good solid look at Chart 2 above then, gives us a fairly good view of how by simply starting the initial nationwide utility grid retrofitting process from a single residential dwelling, all one has to do is work backwards through all aspects of any element of our whole American infrastructure framework and begin the logical task of connecting multiple 21st century mixed energy elements together to form an industrial chain linking energy generation, transportation and all aspects of our whole municipal infrastructure to everything mechanical that can be found along the way while visiting either a Chicago inner city museum to going pumpkin hunting in a farm field in rural Illinois during Halloween. As each of these places are in fact geographical in nature and therefore somewhat multi-faceted in scope, the mechanical functions needed to provide all aspects of advanced industrial infrastructure to these places are essentially the same.

But, again, the only way to grasp the whole of our nation’s potential infrastructure connectivity is to begin by retrofitting a home in Hyde Park, Chicago near the Museum of Science and Industry located on the shores of Lake Michigan while simultaneously doing the same to a home in inner city Dekalb, Illinois that is the home of Northern Illinois University as well as the home of some of America’s most fertile farm land.

Simply put, whereas the homes in Dekalb came before the University, just as the homes in Chicago came before the museum, what drew the museum and the university to these seemingly separate towns was the infrastructure the people in the homes engineered and built to run their neighborhood economies in the first place and what (said infrastructure) today is ultimately responsible for the overall economic decline of those same communities.

Having said the above then, and, again focusing on the funding of transit based infrastructure improvements related to every aspect of advanced 21st century road improvement in America, what should technologically be going on beneath the surface or alongside our roadways is the extension of our electric and natural gas utilities as those utilities are in turn extended by a broad range of either renewable utilities such as wind and solar or utilities such as geothermal or bio gas that naturally begin to strategically co mingle first in our homesteads and neighborhoods, and second, the more distant some of these utilities are from either the urban core of Dekalb, Illinois or the same urban core of Chicago, Illinois. Thus, while within the populated clusters of our nation’s metropolises, the geographical assumption that some of those metropolises are urban in nature whereas others are rural, is both a fundamentally useless and economically disastrous assumption that negates entirely the sheer value of all energy spectrum’s once they are, through, Advanced Metering Infrastructure fully integrated. An excellent case in point here is the financial intersection where CNG fueling intersects with ethanol based fueling of all aspects of America’s transportation grid work as well as the vehicle types that utilize that grid work and those fuel sources (as well as others) to assure the efficient movement of commerce throughout our nation daily.

Going quite logically on the assumption that CNG powered vehicles will be primarily used in the interurban transportation settings found in either of the two cities mentioned above, and, on the equal assumption that such urban oriented vehicles will be used more frequently in those urban environments because of the overall need to go that many more places on a daily basis, fueling stations would obviously need to be found more frequently as well. Knowing this fact then while also knowing that such vehicle fueling stations are as well, food fueling stations (or mini marts), brings to the human architectural design element of the mart, the very same energy based efficiency dialog that would be had in a private residence. With the only real difference in dialog being the financial direction data coming from that fueling station’s Advanced Metering Infrastructure heads in, the overall dynamic becomes how such refueling of CNG powered vehicles also becomes the revenue stream for the constant improvement of the road bed such vehicles travel upon constantly to begin with.

Whereas CNG fueled vehicles will reach a point geographically where building a CNG fueling station is not financially sound, at that same point ethanol or other fuel type based fueling stations most certainly do become financially viable. As such, geographically speaking, whereas the farm land surrounding DeKalb, Illinois would be the host of more ethanol stations than the suburbs surrounding Chicago, such industrial idiosyncrasies (if you will) are in fact not idiosyncrasies, but, instead, highly articulated and profitable economic nuances that could not possibly be capitalized on without the use of Advanced Metering Infrastructure managing such economic and regulatory based interactions in the first place. Thus,rRegardless of the fuel source, it is the function of industrial symmetry that guarantees the success of any fuel source; hence, the more symmetry, the more economic and industrial diversity.

What is quite interesting about the city of DeKalb, Illinois is its remarkable collection of energy sources that have more or less been developed due to the fact that the town is essentially in the middle of a corn field. As it is, it is also the home of a sizable wind turbine farm that produces a sizable amount of electrical energy. What is even more interesting about this situation is that again, geographically speaking, the land that grows the corn which creates the bio fuel and the people fuel and the industrial raw material for a wide range of other end products, is also the land ideally suited for solar farms.

With this being the case and referring once again to Chart 2 above, at the moment structurally/geographically where bio fuel based fuel service stations meet CNG based fuel service stations, another even more tangible industrial/infrastructure based regulatory meeting takes place. That meeting, which is also quite structural and geographical in context, is essentially the interchange of electricity generated from farm based solar arrays to transit based solar arrays that will be found atop the massive architectural footprint of warehousing that is found along interstate highways just outside of major urban areas throughout America. These architectural “sun belts” if you will, not only stand as shrines to our nation’s brilliance in creating warehousing and distribution hubs, but, from the perspective of both energy production and broad spectrum energy distribution, are actually the critical geographical interface for the cohesive merging of energy sources as those sources are brought to full industrial functionality via again, Advanced Metering Infrastructure management. Whereas a Dekalb solar farm situated in and around Dekalb only serves to broaden the electrical supply chain for the region around DeKalb, utilizing the rooftops of our massive American warehousing facilities simply serves as the logical transition point between rural farm based solar arrays and urban residential based rooftop solar arrays. These rooftops do as well serve as the logical point of wind generated electrical power which in rural America is based upon horizontal axis wind turbine use to what in urban America will ultimately become vertical axis wind turbine use. Either way when these two technologies are combined at the point of our nation’s warehousing and shipping corridors, not only does the interface of solar and wind occur, but the subsequent interface of natural gas and geothermal energy occurs as well.

 

But of Course, that’s not all that occurs.

 

Whereas we have already looked at the multi faceted functions of residential and commercial CNG fueling, and in doing so, determined that there are logical geographical cut off points as such points define both the selected placement, construction and subsequent funding of fueling stations for personal vehicles as well as light duty, urban oriented commercial or service or public transit based vehicles, at this same “sun belt” based American shipping and warehousing juncture of both architectural and urban transit applied energy sources, comes the larger “transportational interface” of interstate over the road heavy truck traffic as well as comprehensive freight transportation associated with America’s rail industry. Thus within the framework of pure industrial symmetry is in fact the foundation for dynamic economic symmetry which in turn is the structural foundation for real job growth that demands physical dexterity in every bit the same manner as it demands advanced industrial engineering discipline that ultimately diversifies every manufacturing entity and every construction (building trades) entity in virtually every industrial sector.

Thus, whether or not such an entity has anything whatsoever to do with the production of an energy source is no where near as important to grasp as the fact that every industrial sector is consuming that energy source, and, through highly defined Advanced Metering Infrastructure management, all associated manufacturing and installation functions of an industry change significantly as a result.

As I cannot emphasize enough the importance of starting our nation’s overall reconstruction of every aspect of our public utility infrastructure at the front door of a single residential home in either DeKalb or Chicago simultaneously and working collectively outward to the shipping and distribution “sun belts” that essentially connect the vital urban centers of DeKalb and Chicago to every other town in America, if we can’t articulate the actual industrial needs of a single home in America from the holistic standpoint of what Advanced Metering Infrastructure can only attain, then much sooner than later, our “sun belt” warehouses will find themselves empty due exclusively to the fact that without such infrastructure based job creation, the collective use of mixed energy needed to produce our national goods is entirely squandered.

In other words, if somebody owns an American made company that manufactures work and dress shirts and that company is not utilizing the broad mix of energy systems available to them to manufacture the garments that must ultimately be placed into the homes their workers live in, how can that worker expect to afford to install a closet system that prevents any form of moisture or mold from growing on the garment that hangs in their obsolete urban American bedroom closet to begin with? In the same breath, if someone owns an American made company that manufactures EV’s and the worker for that company wants to both purchase and use that vehicle, how on earth can such an employee do so if his or her garage is devoid of both the charging and financial metering technologies required to keep the car rolling down the road in the first place? As the issue then is that it is one thing to be able to build a state of the art garment manufacturing company that utilizes all aspects of energy source and management, such an accomplishment cannot be deemed as economically valid to the whole of our nation’s energy and utility infrastructure if the company manufacturing the closet system that holds the garment as well as the construction company that installs the system and subsequently attaches the system to the energy grid is and are in fact, equally upgraded.

While all of what I am discussing here seems on one level to be monumentally complex, the role government plays to alleviate such complexity has never been more important to grasp. As there is today a significant dialog pertaining to the fundamental restructuring of virtually every tax base, and, in fact every public utility rate base, the core of all such discussions ultimately boils down to how such an endeavor could actually be pulled of. What is important to understand about this entire conversation however, is not at all what has happened to our national tax base over the past forty years, but the larger understanding of why.

Having said the above, the reason why our tax base has become so tremendously overburdened is that that base has been crafted almost entirely on the overall physical decline of our nation’s historic but obsolete industrial infrastructure. Whereas for decades we had an economy based upon workers who were employed in the construction of that original infrastructure, once such infrastructure was built, massive amounts of labor based revenue were simply lost due to the fact that the infrastructure had been built and only therefore needed to be maintained as opposed to being constantly re engineered and re thought. While national infrastructure maintenance continued for awhile and the equipment designed to maintain that infrastructure grew in technological advancement, eventually the labor decline from the original completion of our nation’s infrastructure met up with the labor decline in the manufacturing of equipment designed to maintain the infrastructure resulting in what is now today in 2016 an enormous philosophical conundrum pertaining to how in fact we fund the whole of technological infrastructure improvement needed today. Where again all of this might sound rather monumental in scope in terms of finding a solution, the solution has never not been there. That solution is the ordinary issuance of municipal bonds buttressed by equally ordinary issuance of long term industrial and public utility bonds that are simply guaranteed by the stocks offered from the companies that are manufacturing, shipping, installing and maintaining our 21st century energy technologies in the first place. The moment such bonds are issued then and such issuance is conjoined with comprehensive modernization of the whole of America’s building codes, which in turn are fully commingled with advanced utility rate structures, which in turn are integrated with traditional mortgage lending models, individual property appraisal and overall neighborhood based property appraisal will not only rise significantly and be woven quite seamlessly together creating not only a substantial work force, but an equally substantial blueprint for sustained long term growth of our overall GDP, which in turn, one more time, guarantees the whole inoculation of distributed energy resources into the whole of our entire nationwide electric utility grid.

To put the Above paragraph into a different analogy, Think About The Following.

 

Let’s just say that a homeowner has the roof capacity to hold a large enough solar array to power his home. Let’s say that not only does he have enough power, but, extra that can be fed back into the grid, and/or can be shared by one or more neighbors who are also connected to a smaller community grid that in and of itself is connected to a larger regional grid. Let’s also say that “having enough electrical power” has only been accomplished after he has had Advanced Metering Infrastructure installed into his entire home power infrastructure, his entire home transportation infrastructure and his entire home, energy efficient architectural footprint.

Within that architectural footprint, this guy has installed a geothermal heating and cooling system to replace an old HVAC heating and cooling system. As he no longer wanted to use natural gas to heat his home, he did still want natural gas for home cooking and bathing on one hand while wanting to utilize compressed natural gas CNG to power his vehicle on the other. While powering the new GEO heating and cooling system demanded less electrical energy to do so than HVAC, the combination of fully retrofitting his home’s entire physical structure and utilizing a variety of additional energy consuming and energy saving “lifestyle technologies” in the process simply enabled him to transfer his natural gas usage to functions he needed in his life but did not need in his home life. In the same breath, by incorporating new technologies into his home that more or less enabled him to redefine his use of electricity both inside and outside of his home, his “whole energy demand model” began a rather remarkable process of both applied industrial and economic transformation.

With the GEO system up and running and providing overall generic year round heating and cooling needs for his home, this guy (let’s call him, Bob), set about the task of installing a somewhat over sized hot water tank into his home which of course was heated by both natural gas and a solar heat exchange system mounted atop his roof with his solar electric generating panels.

As you are probably getting the impression that Bob is somewhat of an advanced thinker, he in fact is. The reason why he chose an over sized hot water heater then was due to the fact that he had a rather advanced perspective on how he and his family would use hot water in their home life. Whereas taking baths and showers, washing the laundry and having preheated water to cook and clean dishes were all traditional functions served by traditional sized hot water heaters, hanging terry cloth bathing towels on water heated towel bars adjacent to large water volume bathing tubs served to change the traditional hot water use dynamic considerably. Whereas such changes were welcome by every member of his family, the family wanted more. Thus, Bob built a steam room whereas he did as well, let the circulating pipes of the whole house hot water heating system flow through the family green house providing timely supplemental heating to this area of Bob’s whole house architectural footprint when his whole house “Advanced Metering Infrastructure” communicated the fact that such heat was needed to keep the spring seedlings perky at 5:00 AM just as the barometric pressure on the outside of that green house began dropping and the subsequent eastern sunrise drew the heat from the greenhouse through the windows designed to let in the sun once it had risen sufficiently enough in the sky to do so.

While all of this was going on with the hot water system, two entirely different electrical systems were doing their thing as well. The main house electrical system, which at 5:00 AM is in somewhat of a slumber mode, was pretty much off line if you will. As it was, the DER system working in conjunction with the overall AMI was getting ready for what would as always be another well managed and productive day of whole energy grid management. With battery storage energy anticipating a rather dramatic rise in outdoor temperature between the hours of 2 – 5 PM, the whole house hot air ventilation system installed on the second and third floors of Bob’s dwelling would be set to open via the use of battery power once the outdoor temperature reached a point where it would overwhelm the capacity of the house GEO heating and cooling system once said temperatures do in fact rise.

If in fact you have been paying attention to what I have been talking about in this essay, you will remember that at the beginning of this essay, I was discussing the architectural matter of fiberglass insulation, and, how, regardless of the amount of insulation installed into any type of dwelling, until the whole of municipal infrastructure functionality is addressed, such concepts of insulating anything are entirely useless, what I am talking about here goes directly to the point of why I made such comments in the first place.

From the standpoint of Bob’s specific residential architectural footprint, that could very much be identical to the architectural footprint of the house next door, his specific AMI information is stating that due to increased external temperatures during the late afternoon hours of a specific day, his whole house hot air ventilation system will open up, and, in doing so, reduce significantly the load on his GEO air conditioning demands. In other words, as hot air simply rises, the notion of having either a GEO or HVAC cooling technology attempting to cool such hot air when allowing such hot air to simply escape, becomes an overwhelmingly well written essay on the need for DER technology in the first place. With the subsequent advanced engineering of insulation technologies as such technologies define either full energy containment or full energy disbursement of overall energy build up inside of Bob’s residential architectural footprint, suffice to say AMI is virtually the only framework from which such holistic architectural energy management can ultimately function from. By simply adding to the above dialog as such dialog pertains to the technological harvesting of released heat, AMI, again, merely suggests, the much broader incorporation of residential based CHP (combined heat and power) development/management as well.

Whereas DER storage technology is really the key to individual residential architectural energy management and is equally the key to broad spectrum energy management of architectural clusters as such clusters can and should be defined as urban block upon urban block of residential neighborhoods or commercial or industrial corridors, EV technology, much like CNG technology, gives us the freedom to entirely leave home without ever having to ask the neighbor to either come in and turn down the thermostat, water the lawn or shovel the snow while we are away vacationing on Pluto only after arriving there via traveling on roads that are just as technologically advanced as our home or any other architectural environment we live and/or do business in.

Within the context of either EV or CNG energy management, there is, as I have stated earlier, ample room for significant long term funding of the surface roads that we do in fact travel over on a daily basis via our nation’s combined public electric and natural gas utility fueling and regulatory infrastructure. As such funding ultimately must be as intricately blueprinted as the whole of Bob’s AMI house, that blueprinting does for all practical purposes start with either watering Bob’s lawn or shoveling his snow when in fact he is away with his family visiting Pluto. As AMI suggests the whole management of sensors and pumps designed to utilize collected rainwater for the purpose of watering Bob’s private property, the moment one moves from Bob’s property to adjacent municipal property, while still engaged in the whole of rainwater management, EV and CNG transit vehicles with highly articulated municipal storm water as well as municipal parks and recreation maintenance tasks assigned to such vehicles through AMI, virtually eliminate ancient municipal fleet function and fleet fueling parameters on one economic level, while on another, open up the regulatory and financial investment justification for installing neighborhood alternative vehicle charging stations substantially in the first place. Whereas once applied, municipal service fleet vehicles “now require” such fueling networks, the simple fact that these fueling stations are in place, suggest personal use as well as commercial use of the same EV or CNG transit technology combined with municipal, more than likely has ample revenue generators attached to the long term upgrading and continued maintenance of the neighborhood residential, commercial and light industrial roadway surfaces such vehicles operate upon.

As again the preliminary funding of such an initiative is, from within a municipal framework, carried out by the issuance of rather traditional municipal bonds, given the overall nature of AMI, I would suggest that the issuance of such bonds would be much more guarantee able if in fact said bonds where neighborhood based and guaranteed by neighborhood development corporations as opposed to city wide financial guarantors.

With the reason for this being that said municipal bond issuance could be offset with equally dynamic micro industrial or micro public utility bonds, suffice to say, the neighborhood based growth of micro industries whose transportation model more or less depended upon both EV and CNG based vehicles would do quite well accordingly. Subsequently, the economic and regulatory functionality of neighborhood micro utility power grids would become that much more capable of monitoring the whole of both electric and natural gas usage and transmission that would ultimately flow through such an overall finely tuned grid network.

Taking transportation (highway improvement) funding a bit further out, such funding goes to the point that I mentioned earlier in this essay. That point is defined by what can only be considered as the effective mileage range of the vehicle as said vehicle travels farther from either a highly clustered urban environment to what should probably be considered as a moderately clustered urban/rural environment from which said vehicle presumably fueled up via either an EV or CNG residential fueling port that in fact obtained such fuel from a stationary electric or natural gas power/refueling grid in the first place. As within these points of travel there are hundreds of miles of changing municipal topography, and, as such, certain infrastructure constraints limit the travel of certain fueled vehicle types, commingled AMI metering of overall regional transportation fueling need brings to bear, among other transportation fueling and funding issues, the exact point where the fueling and the subsequent taxation of bio fueled powered vehicles, brings to our overall nationwide highway funding conundrum a blueprint that will enable the EV or the CNG or the BIO fueled infrastructure to smooth itself out over the course of say several hundred interstate highway miles that are currently devoid of such high tech, multi faceted transit based economic fueling interaction today.

No matter how one chooses to characterize our nation’s plight to create an advanced public utility infrastructure, defining the parameters of whole energy management is simply crucial to that definition. As it might seem somewhat odd that after years of back and forth bickering over the plight of our planet and the rights of those who live on our planet that a simple Advanced Metering Infrastructure device could resolve all such social turmoil, the fact of the matter is that it both can and must much sooner than later.

Below in Chart 3, you will find a rather comprehensive outline of the issues that can be resolved once in fact such a device is used to our collective national benefit.

amifour

Whereas the information contained within Chart 3 above simply lists a rather substantial amount of “data” that needs to be both processed and applied so that we can, as a nation, get on with the task of growing all aspects of our 21st century mixed energy infrastructure, needless to say such a chart is nothing more than yet another interpretation of the structural issues we face.

As it is, in Chart 4, I try to put this dialogue into a more human setting.

Chart 4 is entitled “the Utility Grid, LEVERAGING ENERGY, Powering Finance, In the Neighborhood.”

the utility grid

As you will be able to see from viewing this Chart 4 diagram, the list of things we need to get on with doing in this country, truly needs to be applied in a structural fashion that enables everyone the ability to benefit. Earlier on in this essay, I characterized the fact that all such infrastructure improvement within our nation, ultimately needs to be applied first to one single house in every neighborhood throughout America before we can expect to be able to map succinctly the vast array of advanced energy business models that are all ultimately supposed to be going into out nation’s overwhelming supply of entirely obsolete residential property portfolios. As our residential properties are in fact the engineering vehicles that drive virtually every aspect of our economy, the only possible way for such a drive to be truly ignited throughout our nation is to grasp firmly the concept of strict application of Building Codes that simple allow every expert in every industry, the means necessary to communicate with not just the homeowner, but, virtually every segment of the building trades, municipal regulatory agencies, public utility regulatory bodies, community based educational institutions, labor organizations, bankers, and on and on.

Chart 4 simply gives those who are reading it, my version of what it is that needs to be done so that in fact we can get on with the task of getting it done.

powering finance

Beyond all of that, Chart 5 is simply a picture of a 1957 Chevrolet Apache Step Side Pick Up Truck.

amifive

 

Thanks for stopping by.

self awareness

Mike Patrick Dahlke

 

Curriculum vitae

Monroe Harbor

Please take the time to visit some of my other essays.

Transforming Redundant Affirmative Action To Green Affirmative Action In America

Interior Urban Networks And Sustainable Chicago 2015

Restructuring Public Utility Industrial Demand Response

How To Build An Organic Grain Bin

Urban Planning: The Fine Art Of Attaching Organic Belly Buttons

American Housing, The Bird On A Wire In 2015

The Real Flint, Michigan Water Pipeline

Into Chicago, Making Neighborhoods Economically Green.

Advancing America’s Green Electric Metering Infrastructure

When Green Dollars Go Nowhere, They’re Probably Not Green “The True Nature of Secular Stagnation.”

The National Movement toward Green Urban Renewal Takes a Turn to the Country to Pick Up a Few Things.

Establishing True Green Market Valuation of America’s Non Green Housing Stock

How To Heat An American Sidewalk

The Birth of 21st Century Housing, Transportation and Public Utility Infrastructure Corporations

Establishing A Sustainable 21st Century, Regionally Based Nationwide Housing Finance System.

Painting A Typical American Town Green

Building Green Community Banks With Green Building Codes

How National Building Codes Will Bridge America’s Intelligence Gap.

Financing Our Mixed Energy Use, 21st Century Public Education Imperative

Public and Private Sector Education and Training Models For Our 21st Century, Mixed Energy Use Industrial Economy

Advancing America’s Green Electric Metering Infrastructure

  America’s Advanced Metering Infrastructure Model Mike Patrick Dahlke   The buzz coming from our nation’s public electric utility grid here in 2017 is not the one that would generally be heard say if you were traveling down a rural Kansas farm road and happened to pass beneath the electrical transmission lines while drinking beer […]

 

America’s

Advanced Metering Infrastructure Model

amitwo

Mike Patrick Dahlke

 

The buzz coming from our nation’s public electric utility grid here in 2017 is not the one that would generally be heard say if you were traveling down a rural Kansas farm road and happened to pass beneath the electrical transmission lines while drinking beer and piloting your vintage 1957 Chevy Apache Step Side pick up truck past wheat fields in mid July.

As that Kansas buzz has a very specific high tension tone to it, the buzz I’m talking about today in 2017 is the buzz going on in the engineering and bookkeeping offices of every industry having anything whatsoever to do with the entire reconstruction of our nation’s electric grid. As within this conversation today there are not only an enormous amount of technologies, regulations and energy sources themselves that have to be neatly woven into the fabric of our nation’s obviously aging electric grid, there is the singular most important conversation of cost to be included in that dialog as well.

With the key to cost management essentially wrapped around the ability any electric utility provider has to track the entire path of its electrical current from the moment the current is generated to the moment it is consumed, utilizing Smart Metering Infrastructure is pretty much the consensus tool of choice when it comes to doing so. As these meters are slowly making their way into homes across America, the pace in which this is being done is unfortunately, directly associated with the cost of the smart meter, the time and labor involved with installing the meter and the sheer volume of homes as well as buildings of all types that exist across America that of course, need the meter to begin with. Having said the above, the question becomes twofold; how many years or decades is such an endeavor going to take, and, can the process be brought up to a much faster and more efficient rate of installation if in fact a variety of other equally important American public utility based upgrades were addressed simultaneously?

As the big conversation in today’s public electric utility sector is centering around the incorporation of renewables into the existing framework of our national electric grid, and, smart metering is considered the mechanism from which all of this integration will eventually be enabled, the associated technologies of both solar and wind energy are currently being reviewed not only for their electrical generation attributes, but a host of other electrical providership needs particular to their technologies, or more specifically, to the mobility or whole regulatory segmentation of their interchangeable technologies. Both solar and wind energy can be picked up and moved just as easily as these technologies can be left in place for extended periods of time. Either way, as electrical storage capacity is considered by many as being crucial to the multi faceted success of both wind and solar, any combination of electrical co generation, or storage, really only works if in fact the management of such capacity is itself managed by Advanced Metering Infrastructure.

Yet before infrastructure can be fully managed by advanced metering technologies, infrastructure itself must be fully defined. With this being the case, answering the initial question of how many other equally important American public utility needs can or should be upgraded simultaneously (in conjunction with updating our electric grid) must then be the determining factor from which the full blueprint of the infrastructure definition being sought is in fact found.

To grasp the sheer scope of this endeavor, I have designed a series of charts that I think will help in the general conceptualization of the public utility blueprint I have mentioned above and continue to frame below. Before getting to these charts however, I think a careful assessment of the key regulatory elements currently being considered as being benchmarks from which this utility blueprint to move forward, must be adhered to, is needed.

Energy Efficient Architecture And Evenly Applied Local, Regional and Statewide Building Codes.

 

Energy Efficient Architecture can, in its simplest terminology, be summed up as the ability the homeowner has to do things to their personal architectural environment that will enhance the overall energy conservation of a particular dwelling.

Within the process of doing so, it has, up until the nationwide financial collapse of the housing market, been more or less assumed that an individual homeowner can, either through the efforts of their own physical labor, or, by hiring “professional contractors” make some rather “economically adolescent” energy improvements to their dwelling, and, in doing so, being able to state that in terms of resale valuation, that home is more up to par environmentally and economically than the house next door. Whereas again this more or less sophomoric ideological interpretation of energy efficient architecture inspired our nation as a whole to go out and purchase a few roles of fiberglass insulation and another few energy efficient appliances, all of this was done without even for a moment realizing that every piece of municipal infrastructure going into that residential dwelling was in such a dire need of upgrading, that even if virtually every homeowner in every community were to simply install fiberglass batts while cooking on the coolest new stove on the planet, that infrastructure would still be in the same state of both mechanical and economic collapse.

Knowing this then is sufficient enough reason to ask what in fact the establishment of truly multi dimensional building codes plays not only on the improvement of the whole of our municipal infrastructure, but, the subsequent approach to real property valuation as well as the growth of an educated building trade work force has on both.

As again, currently in our nation, the emphasis on integrating renewable electrical generation technologies into our national electric grid seems to be the general theme, thus far that theme is as relevant economically today in our America as installing fiberglass insulation was prior to the economic collapse of our housing industry. But, as Advanced Metering Infrastructure has the capacity again to elevate the whole of municipal utility infrastructure, surprisingly, neither wind or solar, or, insulation of any form, really has the ability to fully enhance the overall economic model needed to be implemented into the whole of our infrastructure model. Whereas all three are clearly essential, another of several equally renewable energy technologies stands somewhat obscurely at the economic sidelines of our nationwide infrastructure development potential.

With that technology being geothermal energy, and, as geothermal energy cannot in and of itself be considered as being a renewable energy source in and of itself, once the technologies of geothermal (and, several other equally renewable energy system technologies) are fully integrated into our national electric (or whole mixed energy) infrastructure grid via the substantial help of Advanced Metering Infrastructure, the structural industrial and economic fluidity of geothermal melds equally with the fluidity of true renewable energy sources (solar and wind) in every bit the same manner as it does as well meld with traditional main frame electrical generating technologies. As the larger issue here is, of course, that there are virtually no traditional energy sources left in our America today, and the myth that such technologies still exist is wholly financially redundant, geothermal in particular is one energy harvesting technology that has, within its dynamic mechanical framework, perhaps the most architecturally significant capacity to act as one of the structural, building code based benchmarks I mentioned above.

To be quite specific, and, in the process address yet another crucial element of rebuilding our national infrastructure grid, geothermal energy has, within its overall mechanical capacity, certain regionally constraining structural parameters. Whereas I would suggest that a significant nationwide geographical area would of course benefit from the inoculation of geothermal heat pumps into and out of either individual buildings or neighborhood based building clusters for the dual purpose of both heating and cooling the structures contained within such a regional footprint, powering these heat pumps with electricity as opposed to powering HVAC heating technologies with electricity while also fueling HVAC with natural gas, clearly from within a regionally economic and energy efficient standard suggests geothermal over natural gas in a heart beat.

None the less, to suggest for some reason that a building should not be piped for natural gas is as ridiculous as suggesting that a building should not be insulated, the multi dimensional function of natural gas as well as the multidimensional function of stationary electrical storage as that storage pertains to the successful integration of all aspects of solar generation storage capacity brings into this discussion, both the mobility of all energy sources in general as well as again, the need for comprehensive Advanced Metering Integration to begin with.

 

Energy Efficient Architecture – What exactly does Advanced Metering Integration Imply?

In this first chart then is a picture of a typical American house that is connected to the larger national energy grid I have outlined above via AMI technology.

amihouse

Just as I have stated above, once another energy (geothermal for instance) technology is integrated into the whole of all energy based infrastructure technologies, the “system”, if you will, begins the rather dynamic and exciting industrial as well as regulatory process of financially fleshing itself out. As essentially all of what we are doing when integrating a broad host of energy sources into the shell of any given American home is putting meat on the bones of a far too skinny “public electric utility grid” model, we are doing the same with our “natural gas utility grid” that is in some cases creating that electricity to begin with, while in other cases, needlessly stands alone as its’ own efficient, but, somewhat ancient public utility providership model. Whereas alone these two utility models have historically sustained us economically, once both are truly and systemically fleshed out, the outcome will be the capacity of both of these utility models to produce the long term economic food for the tens of thousands of new workers potentially employable in the emerging, multi-segmented energy industries we have had at our creative advanced industrial disposal for several decades, but, for overall lack of systemic connectivity, have become needlessly sidelined due to overwhelming systemic redundancy. Thus again it is Advanced Metering Infrastructure that finally enables all of us to get on with the collective task of rebuilding our nation’s whole infrastructure.

Looking more closely at the above chart, you’ll notice “vehicle EV metering” and “vehicle CNG metering”. The most exciting aspect of these two Advanced Metering Infrastructure models is very much new and very much long term and substantial utility rate generation that is, for all practical purposes, entirely separate from any rate model associated with either existing electric or existing natural gas rate providership structures as such rate structures apply to architectural dwellings as well as overall transportation based fueling function and transportation based infrastructure funding, once such stationary utilities become fully mobile in both their electric and natural gas evolutionary public utility function. With this being the case, and, in fact both of the above mentioned vehicle based fueling models see metering functions as again mobile, or, transit oriented in function, they should be transit oriented in regulatory authority as well. Why this should be so is simple, although such vehicles might very well be fueled at an individuals home, once these vehicles are in motion, they and the vehicles inhabitants are utilizing the roads leading to and away from those homes to conduct business or commerce if you will upon the roadways leading to and from their own private doorstep.

Having stated the above and going back to the chart above, the question becomes, what of any of the energy technologies that are now affixed to an individual home can be affixed to or along the roadway said vehicles travel on as well?

As the answer here is essentially all 21st century energy generating or management technologies found in a 21st century home can and should be embedded into the roads that service that home, again the rate structures and rate revenues found from within Advanced Metering Infrastructure are both diverse and enormous as well as being quite sustainable for the long foreseeable energy future of our nation’s entire utility infrastructure network only if such structures are applied financially to the highway transportation funding mechanisms that unfortunately today are very much unfundable due to the overall obsolescence of 20th century infrastructure symmetry in the first place.

The next chart begins to explain what it is that I mean.

amithree

As again, the moment we look upon energy management for what it actually is today in our 21st century, we find a remarkable array of energy based industrial entities to fill the clearly overwhelming financial infrastructure funding void that is all but stopping the long term sustainable growth of every other industry that relies on such infrastructure to thrive, taking a good solid look at Chart 2 above then, gives us a fairly good view of how by simply starting the initial nationwide utility grid retrofitting process from a single residential dwelling, all one has to do is work backwards through all aspects of any element of our whole American infrastructure framework and begin the logical task of connecting multiple 21st century mixed energy elements together to form an industrial chain linking energy generation, transportation and all aspects of our whole municipal infrastructure to everything mechanical that can be found along the way while visiting either a Chicago inner city museum to going pumpkin hunting in a farm field in rural Illinois during Halloween. As each of these places are in fact geographical in nature and therefore somewhat multi-faceted in scope, the mechanical functions needed to provide all aspects of advanced industrial infrastructure to these places are essentially the same.

But, again, the only way to grasp the whole of our nation’s potential infrastructure connectivity is to begin by retrofitting a home in Hyde Park, Chicago near the Museum of Science and Industry located on the shores of Lake Michigan while simultaneously doing the same to a home in inner city Dekalb, Illinois that is the home of Northern Illinois University as well as the home of some of America’s most fertile farm land.

Simply put, whereas the homes in Dekalb came before the University, just as the homes in Chicago came before the museum, what drew the museum and the university to these seemingly separate towns was the infrastructure the people in the homes engineered and built to run their neighborhood economies in the first place and what (said infrastructure) today is ultimately responsible for the overall economic decline of those same communities.

Having said the above then, and, again focusing on the funding of transit based infrastructure improvements related to every aspect of advanced 21st century road improvement in America, what should technologically be going on beneath the surface or alongside our roadways is the extension of our electric and natural gas utilities as those utilities are in turn extended by a broad range of either renewable utilities such as wind and solar or utilities such as geothermal or bio gas that naturally begin to strategically co mingle first in our homesteads and neighborhoods, and second, the more distant some of these utilities are from either the urban core of Dekalb, Illinois or the same urban core of Chicago, Illinois. Thus, while within the populated clusters of our nation’s metropolises, the geographical assumption that some of those metropolises are urban in nature whereas others are rural, is both a fundamentally useless and economically disastrous assumption that negates entirely the sheer value of all energy spectrum’s once they are, through, Advanced Metering Infrastructure fully integrated. An excellent case in point here is the financial intersection where CNG fueling intersects with ethanol based fueling of all aspects of America’s transportation grid work as well as the vehicle types that utilize that grid work and those fuel sources (as well as others) to assure the efficient movement of commerce throughout our nation daily.

Going quite logically on the assumption that CNG powered vehicles will be primarily used in the interurban transportation settings found in either of the two cities mentioned above, and, on the equal assumption that such urban oriented vehicles will be used more frequently in those urban environments because of the overall need to go that many more places on a daily basis, fueling stations would obviously need to be found more frequently as well. Knowing this fact then while also knowing that such vehicle fueling stations are as well, food fueling stations (or mini marts), brings to the human architectural design element of the mart, the very same energy based efficiency dialog that would be had in a private residence. With the only real difference in dialog being the financial direction data coming from that fueling station’s Advanced Metering Infrastructure heads in, the overall dynamic becomes how such refueling of CNG powered vehicles also becomes the revenue stream for the constant improvement of the road bed such vehicles travel upon constantly to begin with.

Whereas CNG fueled vehicles will reach a point geographically where building a CNG fueling station is not financially sound, at that same point ethanol or other fuel type based fueling stations most certainly do become financially viable. As such, geographically speaking, whereas the farm land surrounding DeKalb, Illinois would be the host of more ethanol stations than the suburbs surrounding Chicago, such industrial idiosyncrasies (if you will) are in fact not idiosyncrasies, but, instead, highly articulated and profitable economic nuances that could not possibly be capitalized on without the use of Advanced Metering Infrastructure managing such economic and regulatory based interactions in the first place. Thus,rRegardless of the fuel source, it is the function of industrial symmetry that guarantees the success of any fuel source; hence, the more symmetry, the more economic and industrial diversity.

What is quite interesting about the city of DeKalb, Illinois is its remarkable collection of energy sources that have more or less been developed due to the fact that the town is essentially in the middle of a corn field. As it is, it is also the home of a sizable wind turbine farm that produces a sizable amount of electrical energy. What is even more interesting about this situation is that again, geographically speaking, the land that grows the corn which creates the bio fuel and the people fuel and the industrial raw material for a wide range of other end products, is also the land ideally suited for solar farms.

With this being the case and referring once again to Chart 2 above, at the moment structurally/geographically where bio fuel based fuel service stations meet CNG based fuel service stations, another even more tangible industrial/infrastructure based regulatory meeting takes place. That meeting, which is also quite structural and geographical in context, is essentially the interchange of electricity generated from farm based solar arrays to transit based solar arrays that will be found atop the massive architectural footprint of warehousing that is found along interstate highways just outside of major urban areas throughout America. These architectural “sun belts” if you will, not only stand as shrines to our nation’s brilliance in creating warehousing and distribution hubs, but, from the perspective of both energy production and broad spectrum energy distribution, are actually the critical geographical interface for the cohesive merging of energy sources as those sources are brought to full industrial functionality via again, Advanced Metering Infrastructure management. Whereas a Dekalb solar farm situated in and around Dekalb only serves to broaden the electrical supply chain for the region around DeKalb, utilizing the rooftops of our massive American warehousing facilities simply serves as the logical transition point between rural farm based solar arrays and urban residential based rooftop solar arrays. These rooftops do as well serve as the logical point of wind generated electrical power which in rural America is based upon horizontal axis wind turbine use to what in urban America will ultimately become vertical axis wind turbine use. Either way when these two technologies are combined at the point of our nation’s warehousing and shipping corridors, not only does the interface of solar and wind occur, but the subsequent interface of natural gas and geothermal energy occurs as well.

 

But of Course, that’s not all that occurs.

 

Whereas we have already looked at the multi faceted functions of residential and commercial CNG fueling, and in doing so, determined that there are logical geographical cut off points as such points define both the selected placement, construction and subsequent funding of fueling stations for personal vehicles as well as light duty, urban oriented commercial or service or public transit based vehicles, at this same “sun belt” based American shipping and warehousing juncture of both architectural and urban transit applied energy sources, comes the larger “transportational interface” of interstate over the road heavy truck traffic as well as comprehensive freight transportation associated with America’s rail industry. Thus within the framework of pure industrial symmetry is in fact the foundation for dynamic economic symmetry which in turn is the structural foundation for real job growth that demands physical dexterity in every bit the same manner as it demands advanced industrial engineering discipline that ultimately diversifies every manufacturing entity and every construction (building trades) entity in virtually every industrial sector.

Thus, whether or not such an entity has anything whatsoever to do with the production of an energy source is no where near as important to grasp as the fact that every industrial sector is consuming that energy source, and, through highly defined Advanced Metering Infrastructure management, all associated manufacturing and installation functions of an industry change significantly as a result.

As I cannot emphasize enough the importance of starting our nation’s overall reconstruction of every aspect of our public utility infrastructure at the front door of a single residential home in either DeKalb or Chicago simultaneously and working collectively outward to the shipping and distribution “sun belts” that essentially connect the vital urban centers of DeKalb and Chicago to every other town in America, if we can’t articulate the actual industrial needs of a single home in America from the holistic standpoint of what Advanced Metering Infrastructure can only attain, then much sooner than later, our “sun belt” warehouses will find themselves empty due exclusively to the fact that without such infrastructure based job creation, the collective use of mixed energy needed to produce our national goods is entirely squandered.

In other words, if somebody owns an American made company that manufactures work and dress shirts and that company is not utilizing the broad mix of energy systems available to them to manufacture the garments that must ultimately be placed into the homes their workers live in, how can that worker expect to afford to install a closet system that prevents any form of moisture or mold from growing on the garment that hangs in their obsolete urban American bedroom closet to begin with? In the same breath, if someone owns an American made company that manufactures EV’s and the worker for that company wants to both purchase and use that vehicle, how on earth can such an employee do so if his or her garage is devoid of both the charging and financial metering technologies required to keep the car rolling down the road in the first place? As the issue then is that it is one thing to be able to build a state of the art garment manufacturing company that utilizes all aspects of energy source and management, such an accomplishment cannot be deemed as economically valid to the whole of our nation’s energy and utility infrastructure if the company manufacturing the closet system that holds the garment as well as the construction company that installs the system and subsequently attaches the system to the energy grid is and are in fact, equally upgraded.

While all of what I am discussing here seems on one level to be monumentally complex, the role government plays to alleviate such complexity has never been more important to grasp. As there is today a significant dialog pertaining to the fundamental restructuring of virtually every tax base, and, in fact every public utility rate base, the core of all such discussions ultimately boils down to how such an endeavor could actually be pulled of. What is important to understand about this entire conversation however, is not at all what has happened to our national tax base over the past forty years, but the larger understanding of why.

Having said the above, the reason why our tax base has become so tremendously overburdened is that that base has been crafted almost entirely on the overall physical decline of our nation’s historic but obsolete industrial infrastructure. Whereas for decades we had an economy based upon workers who were employed in the construction of that original infrastructure, once such infrastructure was built, massive amounts of labor based revenue were simply lost due to the fact that the infrastructure had been built and only therefore needed to be maintained as opposed to being constantly re engineered and re thought. While national infrastructure maintenance continued for awhile and the equipment designed to maintain that infrastructure grew in technological advancement, eventually the labor decline from the original completion of our nation’s infrastructure met up with the labor decline in the manufacturing of equipment designed to maintain the infrastructure resulting in what is now today in 2016 an enormous philosophical conundrum pertaining to how in fact we fund the whole of technological infrastructure improvement needed today. Where again all of this might sound rather monumental in scope in terms of finding a solution, the solution has never not been there. That solution is the ordinary issuance of municipal bonds buttressed by equally ordinary issuance of long term industrial and public utility bonds that are simply guaranteed by the stocks offered from the companies that are manufacturing, shipping, installing and maintaining our 21st century energy technologies in the first place. The moment such bonds are issued then and such issuance is conjoined with comprehensive modernization of the whole of America’s building codes, which in turn are fully commingled with advanced utility rate structures, which in turn are integrated with traditional mortgage lending models, individual property appraisal and overall neighborhood based property appraisal will not only rise significantly and be woven quite seamlessly together creating not only a substantial work force, but an equally substantial blueprint for sustained long term growth of our overall GDP, which in turn, one more time, guarantees the whole inoculation of distributed energy resources into the whole of our entire nationwide electric utility grid.

To put the Above paragraph into a different analogy, Think About The Following.

 

Let’s just say that a homeowner has the roof capacity to hold a large enough solar array to power his home. Let’s say that not only does he have enough power, but, extra that can be fed back into the grid, and/or can be shared by one or more neighbors who are also connected to a smaller community grid that in and of itself is connected to a larger regional grid. Let’s also say that “having enough electrical power” has only been accomplished after he has had Advanced Metering Infrastructure installed into his entire home power infrastructure, his entire home transportation infrastructure and his entire home, energy efficient architectural footprint.

Within that architectural footprint, this guy has installed a geothermal heating and cooling system to replace an old HVAC heating and cooling system. As he no longer wanted to use natural gas to heat his home, he did still want natural gas for home cooking and bathing on one hand while wanting to utilize compressed natural gas CNG to power his vehicle on the other. While powering the new GEO heating and cooling system demanded less electrical energy to do so than HVAC, the combination of fully retrofitting his home’s entire physical structure and utilizing a variety of additional energy consuming and energy saving “lifestyle technologies” in the process simply enabled him to transfer his natural gas usage to functions he needed in his life but did not need in his home life. In the same breath, by incorporating new technologies into his home that more or less enabled him to redefine his use of electricity both inside and outside of his home, his “whole energy demand model” began a rather remarkable process of both applied industrial and economic transformation.

With the GEO system up and running and providing overall generic year round heating and cooling needs for his home, this guy (let’s call him, Bob), set about the task of installing a somewhat over sized hot water tank into his home which of course was heated by both natural gas and a solar heat exchange system mounted atop his roof with his solar electric generating panels.

As you are probably getting the impression that Bob is somewhat of an advanced thinker, he in fact is. The reason why he chose an over sized hot water heater then was due to the fact that he had a rather advanced perspective on how he and his family would use hot water in their home life. Whereas taking baths and showers, washing the laundry and having preheated water to cook and clean dishes were all traditional functions served by traditional sized hot water heaters, hanging terry cloth bathing towels on water heated towel bars adjacent to large water volume bathing tubs served to change the traditional hot water use dynamic considerably. Whereas such changes were welcome by every member of his family, the family wanted more. Thus, Bob built a steam room whereas he did as well, let the circulating pipes of the whole house hot water heating system flow through the family green house providing timely supplemental heating to this area of Bob’s whole house architectural footprint when his whole house “Advanced Metering Infrastructure” communicated the fact that such heat was needed to keep the spring seedlings perky at 5:00 AM just as the barometric pressure on the outside of that green house began dropping and the subsequent eastern sunrise drew the heat from the greenhouse through the windows designed to let in the sun once it had risen sufficiently enough in the sky to do so.

While all of this was going on with the hot water system, two entirely different electrical systems were doing their thing as well. The main house electrical system, which at 5:00 AM is in somewhat of a slumber mode, was pretty much off line if you will. As it was, the DER system working in conjunction with the overall AMI was getting ready for what would as always be another well managed and productive day of whole energy grid management. With battery storage energy anticipating a rather dramatic rise in outdoor temperature between the hours of 2 – 5 PM, the whole house hot air ventilation system installed on the second and third floors of Bob’s dwelling would be set to open via the use of battery power once the outdoor temperature reached a point where it would overwhelm the capacity of the house GEO heating and cooling system once said temperatures do in fact rise.

If in fact you have been paying attention to what I have been talking about in this essay, you will remember that at the beginning of this essay, I was discussing the architectural matter of fiberglass insulation, and, how, regardless of the amount of insulation installed into any type of dwelling, until the whole of municipal infrastructure functionality is addressed, such concepts of insulating anything are entirely useless, what I am talking about here goes directly to the point of why I made such comments in the first place.

From the standpoint of Bob’s specific residential architectural footprint, that could very much be identical to the architectural footprint of the house next door, his specific AMI information is stating that due to increased external temperatures during the late afternoon hours of a specific day, his whole house hot air ventilation system will open up, and, in doing so, reduce significantly the load on his GEO air conditioning demands. In other words, as hot air simply rises, the notion of having either a GEO or HVAC cooling technology attempting to cool such hot air when allowing such hot air to simply escape, becomes an overwhelmingly well written essay on the need for DER technology in the first place. With the subsequent advanced engineering of insulation technologies as such technologies define either full energy containment or full energy disbursement of overall energy build up inside of Bob’s residential architectural footprint, suffice to say AMI is virtually the only framework from which such holistic architectural energy management can ultimately function from. By simply adding to the above dialog as such dialog pertains to the technological harvesting of released heat, AMI, again, merely suggests, the much broader incorporation of residential based CHP (combined heat and power) development/management as well.

Whereas DER storage technology is really the key to individual residential architectural energy management and is equally the key to broad spectrum energy management of architectural clusters as such clusters can and should be defined as urban block upon urban block of residential neighborhoods or commercial or industrial corridors, EV technology, much like CNG technology, gives us the freedom to entirely leave home without ever having to ask the neighbor to either come in and turn down the thermostat, water the lawn or shovel the snow while we are away vacationing on Pluto only after arriving there via traveling on roads that are just as technologically advanced as our home or any other architectural environment we live and/or do business in.

Within the context of either EV or CNG energy management, there is, as I have stated earlier, ample room for significant long term funding of the surface roads that we do in fact travel over on a daily basis via our nation’s combined public electric and natural gas utility fueling and regulatory infrastructure. As such funding ultimately must be as intricately blueprinted as the whole of Bob’s AMI house, that blueprinting does for all practical purposes start with either watering Bob’s lawn or shoveling his snow when in fact he is away with his family visiting Pluto. As AMI suggests the whole management of sensors and pumps designed to utilize collected rainwater for the purpose of watering Bob’s private property, the moment one moves from Bob’s property to adjacent municipal property, while still engaged in the whole of rainwater management, EV and CNG transit vehicles with highly articulated municipal storm water as well as municipal parks and recreation maintenance tasks assigned to such vehicles through AMI, virtually eliminate ancient municipal fleet function and fleet fueling parameters on one economic level, while on another, open up the regulatory and financial investment justification for installing neighborhood alternative vehicle charging stations substantially in the first place. Whereas once applied, municipal service fleet vehicles “now require” such fueling networks, the simple fact that these fueling stations are in place, suggest personal use as well as commercial use of the same EV or CNG transit technology combined with municipal, more than likely has ample revenue generators attached to the long term upgrading and continued maintenance of the neighborhood residential, commercial and light industrial roadway surfaces such vehicles operate upon.

As again the preliminary funding of such an initiative is, from within a municipal framework, carried out by the issuance of rather traditional municipal bonds, given the overall nature of AMI, I would suggest that the issuance of such bonds would be much more guarantee able if in fact said bonds where neighborhood based and guaranteed by neighborhood development corporations as opposed to city wide financial guarantors.

With the reason for this being that said municipal bond issuance could be offset with equally dynamic micro industrial or micro public utility bonds, suffice to say, the neighborhood based growth of micro industries whose transportation model more or less depended upon both EV and CNG based vehicles would do quite well accordingly. Subsequently, the economic and regulatory functionality of neighborhood micro utility power grids would become that much more capable of monitoring the whole of both electric and natural gas usage and transmission that would ultimately flow through such an overall finely tuned grid network.

Taking transportation (highway improvement) funding a bit further out, such funding goes to the point that I mentioned earlier in this essay. That point is defined by what can only be considered as the effective mileage range of the vehicle as said vehicle travels farther from either a highly clustered urban environment to what should probably be considered as a moderately clustered urban/rural environment from which said vehicle presumably fueled up via either an EV or CNG residential fueling port that in fact obtained such fuel from a stationary electric or natural gas power/refueling grid in the first place. As within these points of travel there are hundreds of miles of changing municipal topography, and, as such, certain infrastructure constraints limit the travel of certain fueled vehicle types, commingled AMI metering of overall regional transportation fueling need brings to bear, among other transportation fueling and funding issues, the exact point where the fueling and the subsequent taxation of bio fueled powered vehicles, brings to our overall nationwide highway funding conundrum a blueprint that will enable the EV or the CNG or the BIO fueled infrastructure to smooth itself out over the course of say several hundred interstate highway miles that are currently devoid of such high tech, multi faceted transit based economic fueling interaction today.

No matter how one chooses to characterize our nation’s plight to create an advanced public utility infrastructure, defining the parameters of whole energy management is simply crucial to that definition. As it might seem somewhat odd that after years of back and forth bickering over the plight of our planet and the rights of those who live on our planet that a simple Advanced Metering Infrastructure device could resolve all such social turmoil, the fact of the matter is that it both can and must much sooner than later.

Below in Chart 3, you will find a rather comprehensive outline of the issues that can be resolved once in fact such a device is used to our collective national benefit.

amifour

Whereas the information contained within Chart 3 above simply lists a rather substantial amount of “data” that needs to be both processed and applied so that we can, as a nation, get on with the task of growing all aspects of our 21st century mixed energy infrastructure, needless to say such a chart is nothing more than yet another interpretation of the structural issues we face.

As it is, in Chart 4, I try to put this dialogue into a more human setting.

Chart 4 is entitled “the Utility Grid, LEVERAGING ENERGY, Powering Finance, In the Neighborhood.”

the utility grid

As you will be able to see from viewing this Chart 4 diagram, the list of things we need to get on with doing in this country, truly needs to be applied in a structural fashion that enables everyone the ability to benefit. Earlier on in this essay, I characterized the fact that all such infrastructure improvement within our nation, ultimately needs to be applied first to one single house in every neighborhood throughout America before we can expect to be able to map succinctly the vast array of advanced energy business models that are all ultimately supposed to be going into out nation’s overwhelming supply of entirely obsolete residential property portfolios. As our residential properties are in fact the engineering vehicles that drive virtually every aspect of our economy, the only possible way for such a drive to be truly ignited throughout our nation is to grasp firmly the concept of strict application of Building Codes that simple allow every expert in every industry, the means necessary to communicate with not just the homeowner, but, virtually every segment of the building trades, municipal regulatory agencies, public utility regulatory bodies, community based educational institutions, labor organizations, bankers, and on and on.

Chart 4 simply gives those who are reading it, my version of what it is that needs to be done so that in fact we can get on with the task of getting it done.

powering finance

Beyond all of that, Chart 5 is simply a picture of a 1957 Chevrolet Apache Step Side Pick Up Truck.

amifive

 

Thanks for stopping by.

self awareness

Mike Patrick Dahlke

 

Curriculum vitae

beach ball pianist 3

Please take the time to visit some of my other essays.

Transforming Redundant Affirmative Action To Green Affirmative Action In America

Interior Urban Networks And Sustainable Chicago 2015

Restructuring Public Utility Industrial Demand Response

How To Build An Organic Grain Bin

Urban Planning: The Fine Art Of Attaching Organic Belly Buttons

American Housing, The Bird On A Wire In 2015

The Real Flint, Michigan Water Pipeline

Into Chicago, Making Neighborhoods Economically Green.

Advancing America’s Green Electric Metering Infrastructure

When Green Dollars Go Nowhere, They’re Probably Not Green “The True Nature of Secular Stagnation.”

The National Movement toward Green Urban Renewal Takes a Turn to the Country to Pick Up a Few Things.

Establishing True Green Market Valuation of America’s Non Green Housing Stock

How To Heat An American Sidewalk

The Birth of 21st Century Housing, Transportation and Public Utility Infrastructure Corporations

Establishing A Sustainable 21st Century, Regionally Based Nationwide Housing Finance System.

Painting A Typical American Town Green

Building Green Community Banks With Green Building Codes

How National Building Codes Will Bridge America’s Intelligence Gap.

Financing Our Mixed Energy Use, 21st Century Public Education Imperative

Public and Private Sector Education and Training Models For Our 21st Century, Mixed Energy Use Industrial Economy